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You smell the power politics as soon as you set foot in downtown Washington, D.C. Ambitious young political aides dash from important office to important office in the squat and heavy federal buildings. Crowds and heavy-handed security measures have marred Washington D.C.’s beauty a bit, but a pre-dawn walk past the Washington Monument to the White House and then down the National Mall is still a journey nothing short of magnificent.

The Washington Monument was the tallest structure in the world in 1884, but topped by Eiffel Tower five years later.

At the Lincoln Memorial, you can stand in Martin Luther King’s footsteps – literally, the exact footsteps are marked – where he delivered his stirring 'I Have a Dream' speech. Afterwards touch a bit of a moon rock and see a real Apollo space capsule at the Air and Space Museum. At night time, get out of the government bubble and enjoy the hip restaurant scene in Georgetown.

How’s the weather in Washington DC in June?

Temperature
Clouds days

Average rainfall
79 mm

Demographics

Population
646K
Local time
Currency
USD

What does Washington DC cost?

Meal

Restaurant meals in Washington DC cost 23% more than in Sydney

Train

A typical train ticket is 3.9 AUD

Top 10 Hotels in Washington DC, United States


Places To Visit in Washington DC


  • White House

    White House

    The White House is the official residence and principal workplace of the President of the United Sta

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    White House

    The White House is the official residence and principal workplace of the President of the United States, located at 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue NW in Washington, D.C. It has been the residence of every U.S. president since John Adams in 1800. The house was designed by Irish-born James Hoban and built between 1792 and 1800 of white-painted Aquia Creek sandstone in the Neoclassical style. When Thomas Jefferson moved into the house in 1801, he expanded the building outward, creating two colonnades that were meant to conceal stables and storage. However, in 1814, during the War of 1812, the mansion was set ablaze by the British Army in the Burning of Washington, destroying the interior and charring much of the exterior. Reconstruction began almost immediately, and President James Monroe moved into the partially reconstructed Executive Residence in October 1817. Construction continued with the addition of the South Portico in 1824 and the North in 1829. Because of crowding within the executive mansion itself, President Theodore Roosevelt had all work offices relocated to the newly constructed West Wing in 1901. Eight years later, President William Howard Taft expanded the West Wing and created the first Oval Office which was eventually moved as the section was expanded. The third-floor attic was converted to living quarters in 1927 by augmenting the existing hip roof with long shed dormers. A newly constructed East Wing was used as a reception area for social events; Jefferson's colonnades connected the new wings. East Wing alterations were completed in 1946, creating additional office space. By 1948, the house's load-bearing exterior walls and internal wood beams were found to be close to failure. Under Harry S. Truman, the interior rooms were completely dismantled and a new internal load-bearing steel frame constructed inside the walls. Once this work was completed, the interior rooms were rebuilt. The modern-day White House Complex includes the Executive Residence, West Wing, East Wing, the Eisenhower Executive Office Building—the former State Department, which now houses offices for the President's staff and the Vice President—and Blair House, a guest residence. The Executive Residence is made up of six stories—the Ground Floor, State Floor, Second Floor, and Third Floor, as well as a two-story basement. The term White House is often used as a metonym for the Executive Office of the President of the United States and for the president's administration and advisers in general, as in "The White House has decided that....". The property is a National Heritage Site owned by the National Park Service and is part of the President's Park. In 2007, it was ranked second on the American Institute of Architects list of "America's Favorite Architecture".

  • Lincoln Memorial

    Lincoln Memorial

    The Lincoln Memorial is an American national monument built to honor the 16th President of the Unite

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    Lincoln Memorial

    The Lincoln Memorial is an American national monument built to honor the 16th President of the United States, Abraham Lincoln. It is located on the western end of the National Mall in Washington, D.C., across from the Washington Monument. The architect was Henry Bacon; the designer of the primary statue – Abraham Lincoln, 1920 – was Daniel Chester French; the Lincoln statue was carved by the Piccirilli Brothers; and the painter of the interior murals was Jules Guerin. Dedicated in 1922, it is one of several monuments built to honor an American president. It has always been a major tourist attraction and since the 1930s has been a symbolic center focused on race relations. The building is in the form of a Greek Doric temple and contains a large seated sculpture of Abraham Lincoln and inscriptions of two well-known speeches by Lincoln, The Gettysburg Address and his Second Inaugural Address. The memorial has been the site of many famous speeches, including Martin Luther King's "I Have a Dream" speech, delivered on August 28, 1963, during the rally at the end of the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom. Like other monuments on the National Mall – including the nearby Vietnam Veterans Memorial, Korean War Veterans Memorial, and National World War II Memorial – the memorial is administered by the National Park Service under its National Mall and Memorial Parks group. It has been listed on the National Register of Historic Places since October 15, 1966. It is open to the public 24 hours a day. In 2007, it was ranked seventh on the List of America's Favorite Architecture by the American Institute of Architects. Approximately 6 million people visit the memorial annually.

  • Renwick Gallery

    Renwick Gallery

    The Renwick Gallery is a branch of the Smithsonian American Art Museum, located in Washington, D.C.,

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    Renwick Gallery

    The Renwick Gallery is a branch of the Smithsonian American Art Museum, located in Washington, D.C., and focuses on American craft and decorative arts from the 19th to the 21st century. It is housed in a National Historic Landmark building that was begun in 1859 on Pennsylvania Avenue and originally housed the Corcoran Gallery of Art . When it was built in 1859, it was known as "the American Louvre".

  • Blair House

    Blair House

    Blair House is the official state guest house for the President of the United States. It is located

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    Blair House

    Blair House is the official state guest house for the President of the United States. It is located at 1651–1653 Pennsylvania Avenue NW in Washington, D.C., opposite the Eisenhower Executive Office Building of the White House, off the corner of Lafayette Park. ^ a b "National Register Information System". National Register of Historic Places. National Park Service. 2006-03-15. ^ "History". Blair House. 2005. Retrieved 2009-01-04.

  • Decatur House

    Decatur House

    Decatur House is a historic home in Washington, D.C., named after its first owner and occupant Steph

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    Decatur House

    Decatur House is a historic home in Washington, D.C., named after its first owner and occupant Stephen Decatur. The house is located northwest of Lafayette Square, at the southwest corner of Jackson Place and H Street, near the White House. A museum, it now serves as the National Center for White House History, of the White House Historical Association.

  • National Gallery of Art

    National Gallery of Art

    The National Gallery of Art, and its attached Sculpture Garden, is a national art museum in Washingt

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    National Gallery of Art

    The National Gallery of Art, and its attached Sculpture Garden, is a national art museum in Washington, D.C., located on the National Mall, between 3rd and 9th Streets, at Constitution Avenue NW. Open to the public and free of charge, the museum was privately established in 1937 for the American people by a joint resolution of the United States Congress. Andrew W. Mellon donated a substantial art collection and funds for construction. The core collection includes major works of art donated by Paul Mellon, Ailsa Mellon Bruce, Lessing J. Rosenwald, Samuel Henry Kress, Rush Harrison Kress, Peter Arrell Brown Widener, Joseph E. Widener, and Chester Dale. The Gallery's collection of paintings, drawings, prints, photographs, sculpture, medals, and decorative arts traces the development of Western Art from the Middle Ages to the present, including the only painting by Leonardo da Vinci in the Americas and the largest mobile created by Alexander Calder. The Gallery's campus includes the original neoclassical West Building designed by John Russell Pope, which is linked underground to the modern East Building, designed by I. M. Pei, and the 6.1-acre Sculpture Garden. The Gallery often presents temporary special exhibitions spanning the world and the history of art. ^ Visitor Figures 2012. Exhibition & museum attendance survey // The Art Newspaper № 245. — 2013. — April.

  • National Portrait Gallery (United States)

    National Portrait Gallery (United States)

    The National Portrait Gallery is a historic art museum located at 8th and F Streets NW in Washington

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    National Portrait Gallery (United States)

    The National Portrait Gallery is a historic art museum located at 8th and F Streets NW in Washington, D.C., in the United States. Founded in 1962 and opened to the public in 1968, it is part of the Smithsonian Institution. Its collections focus on images of famous Americans. The museum is housed in the historic Old Patent Office Building. The National Portrait Gallery and the Smithsonian American Art Museum are the eponym for the Gallery Place Washington Metro station, located across the intersection of F and 7th Streets NW.

  • South Downs National Park

    South Downs National Park

    The South Downs National Park is England's newest National Park, having become fully operational on

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    South Downs National Park

    The South Downs National Park is England's newest National Park, having become fully operational on 1 April 2011. The park, covering an area of 1,627 square kilometres in southern England, stretches for 140 kilometres from Winchester in the west to Eastbourne in the east through the counties of Hampshire, West Sussex and East Sussex. The national park covers not only the chalk ridge of the South Downs, with its celebrated chalk downland landscape that culminates in the iconic chalky white cliffs of Beachy Head, but also a substantial part of a separate physiographic region, the western Weald, with its heavily wooded sandstone and clay hills and vales. The South Downs Way spans the entire length of the park and is the only National Trail that lies wholly within a national park.

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