Cheap Flights To Washington DC


1 Traveller(s),Economy

Popular Flights

02:10 AM DEL
Tue, 22 Aug Washington, D.C.
6 Hours 30 Minutes
3 Stops
08:40 AM IAD
Wed, 23 Aug Washington DC
Flight No. - ET 687
7 Seats Left ECONOMY
1,022 USD
12:25 AM DEL
Tue, 22 Aug Washington, D.C.
15 Hours 25 Minutes
2 Stops
03:50 PM IAD
Tue, 22 Aug Washington DC
Flight No. - AF 8649
9 Seats Left ECONOMY
1,126 USD
12:55 PM DEL
Tue, 22 Aug Washington, D.C.
1 Hours 40 Minutes
2 Stops
02:35 PM IAD
Wed, 23 Aug Washington DC
Flight No. - VS 301
1 Seats Left ECONOMY
1,143 USD

Book Flights To Washington DC, Washington DC


You smell the power politics as soon as you set foot in downtown Washington, D.C. Ambitious young political aides dash from important office to important office in the squat and heavy federal buildings. Crowds and heavy-handed security measures have marred Washington D.C.’s beauty a bit, but a pre-dawn walk past the Washington Monument to the White House and then down the National Mall is still a journey nothing short of magnificent.

The Washington Monument was the tallest structure in the world in 1884, but topped by Eiffel Tower five years later.

At the Lincoln Memorial, you can stand in Martin Luther King’s footsteps – literally, the exact footsteps are marked – where he delivered his stirring 'I Have a Dream' speech. Afterwards touch a bit of a moon rock and see a real Apollo space capsule at the Air and Space Museum. At night time, get out of the government bubble and enjoy the hip restaurant scene in Georgetown.

How’s the weather in Washington DC in August?

Temperature
Clear days

Average rainfall
79 mm

Demographics

Population
646K
Local time
Currency
USD

What does Washington DC cost?

Meal

Restaurant meals in Washington DC cost 23% more than in Sydney

Train

A typical train ticket is 3.9 AUD

Top 10 Hotels in Washington DC, United States


Places To Visit in Washington DC


  • White House

    White House

    The White House is the official residence and principal workplace of the President of the United Sta

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    White House

    The White House is the official residence and principal workplace of the President of the United States, located at 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue NW in Washington, D.C. It has been the residence of every U.S. president since John Adams in 1800. The house was designed by Irish-born James Hoban and built between 1792 and 1800 of white-painted Aquia Creek sandstone in the Neoclassical style. When Thomas Jefferson moved into the house in 1801, he expanded the building outward, creating two colonnades that were meant to conceal stables and storage. However, in 1814, during the War of 1812, the mansion was set ablaze by the British Army in the Burning of Washington, destroying the interior and charring much of the exterior. Reconstruction began almost immediately, and President James Monroe moved into the partially reconstructed Executive Residence in October 1817. Construction continued with the addition of the South Portico in 1824 and the North in 1829. Because of crowding within the executive mansion itself, President Theodore Roosevelt had all work offices relocated to the newly constructed West Wing in 1901. Eight years later, President William Howard Taft expanded the West Wing and created the first Oval Office which was eventually moved as the section was expanded. The third-floor attic was converted to living quarters in 1927 by augmenting the existing hip roof with long shed dormers. A newly constructed East Wing was used as a reception area for social events; Jefferson's colonnades connected the new wings. East Wing alterations were completed in 1946, creating additional office space. By 1948, the house's load-bearing exterior walls and internal wood beams were found to be close to failure. Under Harry S. Truman, the interior rooms were completely dismantled and a new internal load-bearing steel frame constructed inside the walls. Once this work was completed, the interior rooms were rebuilt. The modern-day White House Complex includes the Executive Residence, West Wing, East Wing, the Eisenhower Executive Office Building—the former State Department, which now houses offices for the President's staff and the Vice President—and Blair House, a guest residence. The Executive Residence is made up of six stories—the Ground Floor, State Floor, Second Floor, and Third Floor, as well as a two-story basement. The term White House is often used as a metonym for the Executive Office of the President of the United States and for the president's administration and advisers in general, as in "The White House has decided that....". The property is a National Heritage Site owned by the National Park Service and is part of the President's Park. In 2007, it was ranked second on the American Institute of Architects list of "America's Favorite Architecture".

  • Lincoln Memorial

    Lincoln Memorial

    The Lincoln Memorial is an American national monument built to honor the 16th President of the Unite

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    Lincoln Memorial

    The Lincoln Memorial is an American national monument built to honor the 16th President of the United States, Abraham Lincoln. It is located on the western end of the National Mall in Washington, D.C., across from the Washington Monument. The architect was Henry Bacon; the designer of the primary statue – Abraham Lincoln, 1920 – was Daniel Chester French; the Lincoln statue was carved by the Piccirilli Brothers; and the painter of the interior murals was Jules Guerin. Dedicated in 1922, it is one of several monuments built to honor an American president. It has always been a major tourist attraction and since the 1930s has been a symbolic center focused on race relations. The building is in the form of a Greek Doric temple and contains a large seated sculpture of Abraham Lincoln and inscriptions of two well-known speeches by Lincoln, The Gettysburg Address and his Second Inaugural Address. The memorial has been the site of many famous speeches, including Martin Luther King's "I Have a Dream" speech, delivered on August 28, 1963, during the rally at the end of the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom. Like other monuments on the National Mall – including the nearby Vietnam Veterans Memorial, Korean War Veterans Memorial, and National World War II Memorial – the memorial is administered by the National Park Service under its National Mall and Memorial Parks group. It has been listed on the National Register of Historic Places since October 15, 1966. It is open to the public 24 hours a day. In 2007, it was ranked seventh on the List of America's Favorite Architecture by the American Institute of Architects. Approximately 6 million people visit the memorial annually.

  • National Geographic Society

    National Geographic Society

    The National Geographic Society , headquartered in Washington, D.C. in the United States of America,

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    National Geographic Society

    The National Geographic Society , headquartered in Washington, D.C. in the United States of America, is one of the largest nonprofit scientific and educational institutions in the world. Its interests include geography, archaeology and natural science, the promotion of environmental and historical conservation, and the study of world culture and history. The National Geographic Society’s logo is a yellow portrait frame – rectangular in shape – which appears on the margins surrounding the front covers of its magazines and as its television channel logo. It also has its own website that features extra content and worldwide events. ^ "National Geographic Press Room: Fact Sheet". National Geographic Society. Retrieved August 28, 2009. Also note that, as of August 28, 2009 , the official website title is "National Geographic – Inspiring People to Care About the Planet".

  • Vietnam Veterans Memorial

    Vietnam Veterans Memorial

    The Vietnam Veterans Memorial is a 3-acre national memorial in Washington, DC. It honors U.S. servi

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    Vietnam Veterans Memorial

    The Vietnam Veterans Memorial is a 3-acre national memorial in Washington, DC. It honors U.S. service members of the U.S. armed forces who fought in the Vietnam War, service members who died in service in Vietnam/South East Asia, and those service members who were unaccounted for during the War. Its construction and related issues have been the source of controversies, some of which have resulted in additions to the memorial complex. The memorial currently consists of three separate parts: the Three Soldiers statue, the Vietnam Women's Memorial, and the Vietnam Veterans Memorial Wall, which is the best-known part of the memorial. The main part of the memorial, which was completed in 1982, is in Constitution Gardens adjacent to the National Mall, just northeast of the Lincoln Memorial. The memorial is maintained by the U.S. National Park Service, and receives around 3 million visitors each year. The Memorial Wall was designed by American architect Maya Lin. In 2007, it was ranked tenth on the "List of America's Favorite Architecture" by the American Institute of Architects. ^ "National Register Information System". National Register of Historic Places. National Park Service. July 9, 2010.

  • Tomb of the Unknowns

    Tomb of the Unknowns

    The Tomb of the Unknowns is a monument dedicated to American service members who have died without t

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    Tomb of the Unknowns

    The Tomb of the Unknowns is a monument dedicated to American service members who have died without their remains being identified. It is also known as the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier, but it has never been officially named. It is located in Arlington National Cemetery in Virginia, United States of America. The World War I "Unknown" is a recipient of the Medal of Honor, the Victoria Cross, and several other foreign nations' highest service awards. The U.S. Unknowns who were interred are also recipients of the Medal of Honor, presented by U.S. Presidents who presided over their funerals.

  • Ted Kennedy

    Ted Kennedy

    Edward Moore "Ted" Kennedy was a United States Senator from Massachusetts and a member of the Democ

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    Ted Kennedy

    Edward Moore "Ted" Kennedy was a United States Senator from Massachusetts and a member of the Democratic Party. He was the second most senior member of the Senate when he died and was the fourth-longest-serving senator in United States history, having served there for almost 47 years. The most prominent living member of the Kennedy family for many years, he was the last surviving son of Joseph P. Kennedy, Sr. and Rose Kennedy; the youngest brother of President John F. Kennedy and Senator Robert F. Kennedy, both victims of assassination; and the father of Congressman Patrick J. Kennedy. Kennedy entered the Senate in a November 1962 special election to fill the seat once held by his brother John. He was elected to a full six-year term in 1964 and was reelected seven more times. The Chappaquiddick incident on July 18, 1969, resulted in the death of his automobile passenger, Mary Jo Kopechne. Kennedy pleaded guilty to a charge of leaving the scene of an accident; the incident and its aftermath hindered his chances of ever becoming President of the United States. His one attempt, in the 1980 presidential election, resulted in a Democratic primary campaign loss to incumbent President Jimmy Carter. Kennedy was known for his charisma and oratorical skills. His 1968 eulogy for his brother Robert and his 1980 rallying cry for modern American liberalism were among his best-known speeches. He became recognized as "The Lion of the Senate" through his long tenure and influence. More than 300 bills that Kennedy and his staff wrote were enacted into law. Unabashedly liberal, Kennedy championed an interventionist government emphasizing economic and social justice, but was also known for working with Republicans to find compromises between senators with disparate views. Kennedy played a major role in passing many laws, including laws addressing immigration, cancer research, health insurance, apartheid, disability discrimination, AIDS care, civil rights, mental health benefits, children's health insurance, education and volunteering. During the 2000s, he led several unsuccessful immigration reform efforts. Over the course of his Senate career and continuing into the Obama administration, Kennedy continued his efforts to enact universal health care, which he called the "cause of my life." In May 2008, Kennedy was hospitalized after suffering a seizure and was diagnosed with a malignant brain tumor, which limited his appearances in the Senate. He died August 2009 at his Hyannis Port, Massachusetts home. By the later years of his life, he had come to be viewed as a major figure and spokesman for American progressivism.

  • Washington metropolitan area

    Washington metropolitan area

    The Washington metropolitan area is the metropolitan area centered on Washington, D.C., the capital

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    Washington metropolitan area

    The Washington metropolitan area is the metropolitan area centered on Washington, D.C., the capital of the United States. The area includes all of the federal district and parts of the U.S. states of Maryland and Virginia, along with a small portion of West Virginia. The Washington metropolitan area is the most educated and, by some measures, the most affluent metropolitan area in the United States. As of the 2012 U.S. Census Bureau estimate, the population of the Washington metropolitan area was estimated to be 5,860,342, making it the largest metropolitan area in the Census' Southeast region and the seventh-largest metropolitan area in the country. ^ ^ "Washington area richest, most educated in US: report". Washingtonpost.com. 2006-06-08. Retrieved 2012-11-19. ^ Annual Estimates of the Population of Metropolitan and Micropolitan Statistical Areas: April 1, 2000 to July 1, 2009

  • Charles Durning

    Charles Durning

    Charles Edward Durning was an American actor, with appearances in over 200 movies, television shows

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    Charles Durning

    Charles Edward Durning was an American actor, with appearances in over 200 movies, television shows and plays. Durning's memorable roles included the Oscar-winning The Sting and Dog Day Afternoon , along with the comedies Tootsie , and The Best Little Whorehouse in Texas and To Be or Not to Be .

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