Cheap Flights To Rome


14 °C

05:14 AM
1 Traveller(s),Economy
1 Person in1 Room

Popular Flights

09:20 PM IAD
Sat, 25 Feb Washington, D.C.
18 Hours 35 Minutes
2 Stops
03:55 PM FCO
Sun, 26 Feb Rome
Flight No. - AT 219
9 Seats Left ECONOMY
694 USD
05:15 PM IAD
Sat, 25 Feb Washington, D.C.
17 Hours 20 Minutes
2 Stops
10:35 AM FCO
Sun, 26 Feb Rome
Flight No. - SK 926
9 Seats Left ECONOMY
2,566 USD
05:00 PM IAD
Sat, 25 Feb Washington, D.C.
17 Hours 45 Minutes
2 Stops
10:45 AM FCO
Sun, 26 Feb Rome
Flight No. - DL 3849
6 Seats Left ECONOMY
2,676 USD

Book Flights To Rome, Rome


Meeting the Italians can be rather overwhelming. In Rome, reason and order are challenged all the way by passion and 'gioia di vivere' – the joy of living. Let down your guards and simply surrender for a while. Rome is overwhelmingly beautiful. This is true whether you visit the many famous piazzas or you gravitate towards the more obscure corners of town.

In ancient Rome it was common practise to put a phallic symbol above the door for good luck and fertility.

Rome is virtually one big jewellery chest of drastic contrasts: Antique and modern. Relaxed and passionate. Worldly and religious. Rome’s sheer beauty lies in the paradoxical mix of extremes that flow together to create an intriguing beauty. The Romans are known as passionate, generous and disorganized hedonists with an extremely flexible attitude to the concept of time. Bring a pocket-sized book so you are prepared to wait, relax and go with the flow.

How’s the weather in Rome in February?

Temperature
5 - 15 °C
Rain days
14 °C

Average rainfall
49 mm

Demographics

Population
2.7M
Local time
05:14 AM
Currency
EUR

What does Rome cost?

Meal

Restaurant meals in Rome cost 82% more than in New Delhi

Train

A typical train ticket is 110 INR

Top 10 Hotels in Rome, Italy


Places To Visit in Rome


  • Archbasilica of St. John Lateran

    Archbasilica of St. John Lateran

    The Papal Archbasilica of St. John in the Lateran , commonly known as St. John Lateran's Archbasilic

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    Archbasilica of St. John Lateran

    The Papal Archbasilica of St. John in the Lateran , commonly known as St. John Lateran's Archbasilica, St. John Lateran's Basilica, St. John Lateran, or just The Lateran Basilica, is the cathedral church of the Diocese of Rome and the official ecclesiastical seat of the Bishop of Rome, who is the Pope. It is the oldest and ranks first among the five Papal Basilicas of the world and the four Major Basilicas of Rome , being the oldest church in the West and having the Cathedra of the Bishop of Rome. It has the title of ecumenical mother church among Roman Catholics. The current archpriest is Agostino Vallini, Cardinal Vicar General for the Diocese of Rome. The President of the French Republic, currently François Hollande, is ex officio the "first and only honorary canon" of the Archbasilica, a title held by the heads of state of France since King Henry IV. The large inscription on the façade reads in Latin: Clemens XII Pont Max Anno V Christo Salvatori In Hon SS Ioan Bapt et Evang; which a highly abbreviated inscription translated as "Pope Clement XII, in the fifth year of his reign, dedicated this building to Christ the Savior, in honor of Saints John the Baptist and John the Evangelist". This is because the Archbasilica, as indicated by its full title was originally dedicated to Christ the Savior, with the co-dedications to the two St. Johns being made centuries later. As the cathedral of the Bishop of Rome, it ranks above all other churches in the Catholic Church, including St. Peter's Basilica. For that reason, unlike all other Catholic basilicas, it is titled Archbasilica. The Archbasilica is located within the City of Rome but is outside the boundaries of Vatican City proper, which is located in another part of Rome. While the Archbasilica and its adjoining buildings enjoy extraterritorial status as one of the properties of the Holy See pursuant to the Lateran Treaty of 1929, the Archbasilica is within Italian territory and not that of the Vatican City State.

  • Villa Torlonia (Rome)

    Villa Torlonia (Rome)

    Villa Torlonia is a villa and surrounding gardens in Rome, Italy, formerly belonging to the Torlonia

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    Villa Torlonia (Rome)

    Villa Torlonia is a villa and surrounding gardens in Rome, Italy, formerly belonging to the Torlonia family. It is entered from the via Nomentana. It was designed by the neo-Classic architect Giuseppe Valadier. Construction began in 1806 for the banker Giovanni Torlonia and was finished by his son Alessandro . Disused for a time, Mussolini rented it from the Torlonia for one lira a year to use as his state residence from the 1920s onwards. It was abandoned after 1945, and allowed to decay in the following decades, but recent restoration work has allowed it to be opened to the public as a museum owned and operated by Rome's municipality.

  • Porta Maggiore

    Porta Maggiore

    The Porta Maggiore , or Porta Prenestina, is one of the eastern gates in the ancient but well-preser

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    Porta Maggiore

    The Porta Maggiore , or Porta Prenestina, is one of the eastern gates in the ancient but well-preserved 3rd-century Aurelian Walls of Rome. Through the gate ran two ancient roads: the Via Praenestina and the Via Labicana. The Via Prenestina was the eastern road to the ancient town of Praeneste . The Via Labicana heads southeast from the city.

  • Servian Wall

    Servian Wall

    The Servian Wall was a defensive barrier constructed around the city of Rome in the early 4th centu

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    Servian Wall

    The Servian Wall was a defensive barrier constructed around the city of Rome in the early 4th century BC. The wall was up to 10 metres in height in places, 3.6 metres wide at its base, 11 km long, and is believed to have had 16 main gates, though many of these are mentioned only from writings, with no other known remains.

  • Sacro Cuore di Gesù a Castro Pretorio

    Sacro Cuore di Gesù a Castro Pretorio

    Sacro Cuore di Gesú al Castro Pretorio is a Roman Catholic parish and titular church in Rome, Ital

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    Sacro Cuore di Gesù a Castro Pretorio

    Sacro Cuore di Gesú al Castro Pretorio is a Roman Catholic parish and titular church in Rome, Italy. It was built in 1887 by Francesco Vespignani. Dedicated to the Sacred Heart of Jesus, the church is served by the Salesians. It has an adjoining boarding-school of arts and industries. The church was elevated to minor basilica status in 1921.

  • Piazza Vittorio Emanuele II (Rome)

    Piazza Vittorio Emanuele II (Rome)

    Piazza Vittorio Emanuele II, also known as Piazza Vittorio, is a piazza in Rome, in the Esquilino ri

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    Piazza Vittorio Emanuele II (Rome)

    Piazza Vittorio Emanuele II, also known as Piazza Vittorio, is a piazza in Rome, in the Esquilino rione. It is served by the Vittorio Emanuele Metro station. Surrounded by palazzi with large porticoes in the 19th century style, the piazza was built by Gaetano Koch shortly after the unification of Italy. Umbertine in style, it is the largest piazza in Rome . In the centre of the piazza is a garden with the remains of a fountain built by Alexander Severus , and the Porta Alchemica , the entrance to Villa Palombara, former residence of the alchemist Marquis Palombara. ^ http://roma.repubblica.it/dettaglio/esquilino-tra-nerone-e-ramadan/1514454

  • Santa Croce in Gerusalemme

    Santa Croce in Gerusalemme

    The Basilica of the Holy Cross in Jerusalem is a Roman Catholic minor basilica and titular church i

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    Santa Croce in Gerusalemme

    The Basilica of the Holy Cross in Jerusalem is a Roman Catholic minor basilica and titular church in rione Esquilino, Rome, Italy. It is one of the Seven Pilgrim Churches of Rome. According to tradition, the Basilica was consecrated circa 325 to house the relics of the Passion of Jesus Christ brought to Rome from the Holy Land by St. Empress Helena, mother of Roman Emperor Constantine I. At that time, the Basilica's floor was covered with soil from Jerusalem, thus acquiring the title in Hierusalem; it is not dedicated to the Holy Cross which is in Jerusalem, but the Basilica itself is "in Jerusalem" in the sense that a "piece" of Jerusalem was moved to Rome for its foundation. The current Cardinal Priest of the Titulus S. Crucis in Hierusalem is Miloslav Vlk.

  • Santa Costanza

    Santa Costanza

    Santa Costanza is a 4th-century church in Rome, Italy, on the Via Nomentana, which runs north-east o

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    Santa Costanza

    Santa Costanza is a 4th-century church in Rome, Italy, on the Via Nomentana, which runs north-east out of the city. According to the traditional view, it was built under Constantine I as a mausoleum for his daughter Constantina who died in 354 AD. His other daughter Helena, wife of Julian, who died in 360 AD, was also buried here. In the Middle Ages it was dedicated as a church to Santa Costanza , who was regarded as a saint. It was built next to, and in connection with, the 4th century Basilica of Santa Agnese . Both buildings were constructed over the earlier catacombs in which Saint Agnes is believed to be buried. The mausoleum is of circular form with an ambulatory surrounding a central dome. The fabric of Santa Costanza survives in essentially its original form. Despite the loss of the coloured stone veneers of the walls, some damage to the mosaics and incorrect restoration, the building stands in excellent condition as a prime example of Early Christian art and architecture. The vaults of the apses and ambulatory display well preserved examples of Late Roman mosaics. A key component which is missing from the decorative scheme is the mosaic of the central dome. In the sixteenth-century, watercolours were made of this central dome so the pictorial scheme can be hypothetically reconstructed. The large porphyry sarcophagus of Constantina, has survived intact, and is now in the Vatican Museum. an object of great significance to the study of the art of Late Antiquity. Recent excavations suggest that this was in fact the second Christian building on the site, and may be some decades later than traditionally thought, and built as a mausoleum for Constantina's sister Helena in the reign of her husband Julian the Apostate. The larger of the two porphyry sarcophagi there would belong to Helena, and the smaller to Constantina, the opposite of what has been traditionally thought. The earlier triconch apsed building of the 330s was probably indeed built for Constantina, but she later had to take second place to her sister; as Constantina's fame as a saintly figure continued in the Middle Ages their roles became reversed in the popular mind.

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