Cheap Flights To Rome


1 Traveller(s),Economy

Popular Flights

01:30 AM DEL
Tue, 22 Aug Washington, D.C.
12 Hours 20 Minutes
2 Stops
01:50 PM FCO
Tue, 22 Aug Rome
Flight No. - KU 382
9 Seats Left ECONOMY
457 USD
10:05 AM DEL
Tue, 22 Aug Washington, D.C.
10 Hours 45 Minutes
2 Stops
08:50 PM FCO
Tue, 22 Aug Rome
Flight No. - QR 571
6 Seats Left ECONOMY
469 USD
01:30 AM DEL
Tue, 22 Aug Washington, D.C.
12 Hours 55 Minutes
2 Stops
02:25 PM FCO
Tue, 22 Aug Rome
Flight No. - SU 235
4 Seats Left ECONOMY
495 USD

Book Flights To Rome, Rome


Meeting the Italians can be rather overwhelming. In Rome, reason and order are challenged all the way by passion and 'gioia di vivere' – the joy of living. Let down your guards and simply surrender for a while. Rome is overwhelmingly beautiful. This is true whether you visit the many famous piazzas or you gravitate towards the more obscure corners of town.

In ancient Rome it was common practise to put a phallic symbol above the door for good luck and fertility.

Rome is virtually one big jewellery chest of drastic contrasts: Antique and modern. Relaxed and passionate. Worldly and religious. Rome’s sheer beauty lies in the paradoxical mix of extremes that flow together to create an intriguing beauty. The Romans are known as passionate, generous and disorganized hedonists with an extremely flexible attitude to the concept of time. Bring a pocket-sized book so you are prepared to wait, relax and go with the flow.

How’s the weather in Rome in August?

Temperature
Clear days

Average rainfall
49 mm

Demographics

Population
2.7M
Local time
Currency
EUR

What does Rome cost?

Meal

Restaurant meals in Rome cost 82% more than in New Delhi

Train

A typical train ticket is 110 INR

Top 10 Hotels in Rome, Italy


Places To Visit in Rome


  • St. Peter's Basilica

    St. Peter's Basilica

    The Papal Basilica of St. Peter in the Vatican, or simply St. Peter's Basilica , is a Late Renaissan

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    St. Peter's Basilica

    The Papal Basilica of St. Peter in the Vatican, or simply St. Peter's Basilica , is a Late Renaissance church located within Vatican City. Designed principally by Donato Bramante, Michelangelo, Carlo Maderno and Gian Lorenzo Bernini, St. Peter's is the most renowned work of Renaissance architecture and remains one of the two largest churches in the world. While it is neither the mother church of the Catholic Church nor the Catholic Roman Rite cathedral of the Diocese of Rome, St. Peter's is regarded as one of the holiest Catholic shrines. It has been described as "holding a unique position in the Christian world" and as "the greatest of all churches of Christendom". By Catholic Tradition, the Basilica is the burial site of its namesake St. Peter, one of the Apostles of Jesus Christ and, also according to Tradition, the first Pope and Bishop of Rome. Tradition and strong historical evidence hold that St. Peter's tomb is directly below the high altar of the Basilica. For this reason, many Popes have been interred at St. Peter's since the Early Christian period. There has been a church on this site since the time of the Roman Emperor Constantine the Great. Construction of the present basilica, replacing the Old St. Peter's Basilica of the 4th century AD, began on 18 April 1506 and was completed on 18 November 1626. St. Peter's is famous as a place of pilgrimage, for its liturgical functions. Because of its location in the Vatican, the Pope presides at a number of liturgies throughout the year, drawing audiences of 15,000 to over 80,000 people, either within the Basilica or its adjoining St. Peter's Square. St. Peter's has many strong historical associations, with the Early Christian Church, the Papacy, the Protestant Reformation and Catholic Counter-reformation, and with numerous artists, most significantly Michelangelo. As a work of architecture, it is regarded as the greatest building of its age. St. Peter's is one of the four churches of Rome that hold the rank of Major Basilica. Contrary to popular misconception, it is not a cathedral because it is not the seat of a bishop; the Cathedra of the Pope as Bishop of Rome is located in the Archbasilica of St. John Lateran.

  • Spanish Steps

    Spanish Steps

    The Spanish Steps are a set of steps in Rome, Italy, climbing a steep slope between the Piazza di S

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    Spanish Steps

    The Spanish Steps are a set of steps in Rome, Italy, climbing a steep slope between the Piazza di Spagna at the base and Piazza Trinità dei Monti, dominated by the Trinità dei Monti church at the top. The monumental stairway of 135 steps was built with French diplomat Étienne Gueffier’s bequeathed funds of 20,000 scudi, in 1723–1725, linking the Bourbon Spanish Embassy, and the Trinità dei Monti church that was under the patronage of the Bourbon kings of France, both located above — to the Holy See in Palazzo Monaldeschi located below. The stairway was designed by architects Francesco de Sanctis and Alessandro Specchi.

  • Roman Forum

    Roman Forum

    The Roman Forum is a rectangular forum surrounded by the ruins of several important ancient govern

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    Roman Forum

    The Roman Forum is a rectangular forum surrounded by the ruins of several important ancient government buildings at the center of the city of Rome. Citizens of the ancient city referred to this space, originally a marketplace, as the Forum Magnum, or simply the Forum. It was for centuries the center of Roman public life: the site of triumphal processions and elections; the venue for public speeches, criminal trials, and gladiatorial matches; and the nucleus of commercial affairs. Here statues and monuments commemorated the city's great men. The teeming heart of ancient Rome, it has been called the most celebrated meeting place in the world, and in all history. Located in the small valley between the Palatine and Capitoline Hills, the Forum today is a sprawling ruin of architectural fragments and intermittent archaeological excavations attracting 4.5 million sightseers yearly. Many of the oldest and most important structures of the ancient city were located on or near the Forum. The Roman kingdom's earliest shrines and temples were located on the southeastern edge. These included the ancient former royal residence, the Regia , and the Temple of Vesta , as well as the surrounding complex of the Vestal Virgins, all of which were rebuilt after the rise of imperial Rome. Other archaic shrines to the northwest, such as the Umbilicus Urbis and the Vulcanal , developed into the Republic's formal Comitium . This is where the Senate—as well as Republican government itself—began. The Senate House, government offices, tribunals, temples, memorials and statues gradually cluttered the area. Over time the archaic Comitium was replaced by the larger adjacent Forum and the focus of judicial activity moved to the new Basilica Aemilia . Some 130 years later, Julius Caesar built the Basilica Julia, along with the new Curia Julia, refocusing both the judicial offices and the Senate itself. This new Forum, in what proved to be its final form, then served as a revitalized city square where the people of Rome could gather for commercial, political, judicial and religious pursuits in ever greater numbers. Eventually much economic and judicial business would transfer away from the Forum Romanum to the larger and more extravagant structures to the north. The reign of Constantine the Great, during which the Empire was divided into its Eastern and Western halves, saw the construction of the last major expansion of the Forum complex—the Basilica of Maxentius . This returned the political center to the Forum until the fall of the Western Roman Empire almost two centuries later.

  • Trevi Fountain

    Trevi Fountain

    The Trevi Fountain is a fountain in the Trevi district in Rome, Italy, designed by Italian architec

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    Trevi Fountain

    The Trevi Fountain is a fountain in the Trevi district in Rome, Italy, designed by Italian architect Nicola Salvi and completed by Pietro Bracci. Standing 26.3 metres high and 49.15 metres wide, it is the largest Baroque fountain in the city and one of the most famous fountains in the world. The fountain has appeared in several notable films, including Federico Fellini's La Dolce Vita, and is a popular tourist attraction.

  • Pantheon, Rome

    Pantheon, Rome

    The Pantheon is a building in Rome, Italy, commissioned by Marcus Agrippa during the reign of Augus

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    Pantheon, Rome

    The Pantheon is a building in Rome, Italy, commissioned by Marcus Agrippa during the reign of Augustus and rebuilt by the emperor Hadrian about 126 AD. The building is circular with a portico of large granite Corinthian columns under a pediment. A rectangular vestibule links the porch to the rotunda, which is under a coffered concrete dome, with a central opening to the sky. Almost two thousand years after it was built, the Pantheon's dome is still the world's largest unreinforced concrete dome. The height to the oculus and the diameter of the interior circle are the same, 43.3 metres . It is one of the best-preserved of all Ancient Roman buildings. It has been in continuous use throughout its history, and since the 7th century, the Pantheon has been used as a church dedicated to "St. Mary and the Martyrs" but informally known as "Santa Maria Rotonda". The square in front of the Pantheon is called Piazza della Rotonda.

  • Colosseum

    Colosseum

    The Colosseum or Coliseum, also known as the Flavian Amphitheatre , is an elliptical amphitheatre in

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    Colosseum

    The Colosseum or Coliseum, also known as the Flavian Amphitheatre , is an elliptical amphitheatre in the centre of the city of Rome, Italy. Built of concrete and stone, it is the largest amphitheatre in the world, and is considered one of the greatest works of architecture and engineering. The Colosseum is situated just east of the Roman Forum. Construction began under the emperor Vespasian in 72 AD, and was completed in 80 AD under his successor and heir Titus. Further modifications were made during the reign of Domitian . These three emperors are known as the Flavian dynasty, and the amphitheatre was named in Latin for its association with their family name . The Colosseum could hold, it is estimated, between 50,000 and 80,000 spectators, and was used for gladiatorial contests and public spectacles such as mock sea battles, animal hunts, executions, re-enactments of famous battles, and dramas based on Classical mythology. The building ceased to be used for entertainment in the early medieval era. It was later reused for such purposes as housing, workshops, quarters for a religious order, a fortress, a quarry, and a Christian shrine. Although in the 21st century it stays partially ruined because of damage caused by devastating earthquakes and stone-robbers, the Colosseum is an iconic symbol of Imperial Rome. It is one of Rome's most popular tourist attractions and has close connections with the Roman Catholic Church, as each Good Friday the Pope leads a torchlit "Way of the Cross" procession that starts in the area around the Colosseum. In 2007 the complex was included among the New7Wonders of the World, following a competition organized by New Open World Corporation . The Colosseum is also depicted on the Italian version of the five-cent euro coin. ^ "Building the Colosseum". roman-colosseum.info. ^ The Colosseum: Largest Amphitheatre. Guinness World Records.com. 2013. Retrieved 6 March 2013. ^ Hopkins, Keith; Beard, Mary . The Colosseum. Harvard University Press. p. 2. ISBN 0-674-01895-8. Retrieved 19 January 2011. ^ "BBC's History of the Colosseum p. 2". Bbc.co.uk. 22 March 2011. Retrieved 16 April 2012. ^ Roth, Leland M. . Understanding Architecture: Its Elements, History and Meaning . Boulder, CO: Westview Press. ISBN 0-06-430158-3. ^ William H. Byrnes IV "Ancient Roman Munificence: The Development of the Practice and Law of Charity". Rutgers Law Review vol. 57, issue 3, pp. 1043–1110. ^ "BBC's History of the Colosseum p. 1". Bbc.co.uk. 22 March 2011. Retrieved 16 April 2012. ^ "Frommer's Events – Event Guide: Good Friday Procession in Rome ". Frommer's. Retrieved 8 April 2008.

  • Pope John Paul II assassination attempt

    Pope John Paul II assassination attempt

    The first attempted assassination of Pope John Paul II took place on Wednesday, 13 May 1981, in St.

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    Pope John Paul II assassination attempt

    The first attempted assassination of Pope John Paul II took place on Wednesday, 13 May 1981, in St. Peter's Square at Vatican City. The Pope was shot and wounded by Mehmet Ali Ağca while he was entering the square. The Pope was struck four times, and suffered severe blood loss. Ağca was apprehended immediately, and later sentenced to life in prison by an Italian court. The Pope later forgave Ağca for the assassination attempt. He was pardoned by Italian president Carlo Azeglio Ciampi at the Pope's request and was deported to Turkey in June 2000.

  • Largo di Torre Argentina

    Largo di Torre Argentina

    Largo di Torre Argentina is a square in Rome, Italy, that hosts four Republican Roman temples, and t

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    Largo di Torre Argentina

    Largo di Torre Argentina is a square in Rome, Italy, that hosts four Republican Roman temples, and the remains of Pompey's Theatre. It is located in the ancient Campus Martius. The name of the square comes from the Torre Argentina, which takes its name from the city of Strasbourg, whose Latin name was Argentoratum. In 1503, the Papal Master of Ceremonies Johannes Burckardt, who came from Strasbourg and was known as "Argentinus", built in via del Sudario a palace , called Casa del Burcardo, to which the tower is annexed. The other tower in the square is not the one giving the name to the place, but the Medieval Torre del Papito , attributed by tradition to Antipope Anacletus II Pierleoni, allegedly not a tall person. After Italian unification, it was decided to reconstruct part of Rome , demolishing the zone of Torre Argentina. However, during the demolition work in 1927, the colossal head and arms of a marble statue were discovered. The archeological investigation brought to light the presence of a holy area, dating to the Republican era, with four temples and part of Pompey's Theater. Julius Caesar was killed in the Curia of the Theatre of Pompey, and the spot he was believed to be assassinated is in the square. ^ Giuseppe Marchetti Longhi . L'area sacra del Largo argentina. Istituto poligrafico dello Stato, Libreria dello Stato. ^ Filippo Coarelli . Rome and Environs: An Archaeological Guide. University of California Press. pp. 284–. ISBN 978-0-520-95780-0.

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