Cheap Flights To Paris


1 Traveller(s),Economy

Popular Flights

01:30 AM DEL
Tue, 22 Aug Washington, D.C.
11 Hours 15 Minutes
2 Stops
12:45 PM CDG
Tue, 22 Aug Paris
Flight No. - KU 382
9 Seats Left ECONOMY
580 USD
09:50 PM DEL
Tue, 22 Aug Washington, D.C.
11 Hours 35 Minutes
2 Stops
09:25 AM CDG
Wed, 23 Aug Paris
Flight No. - EK 515
2 Seats Left ECONOMY
585 USD
01:15 PM DEL
Tue, 22 Aug Washington, D.C.
5 Hours 40 Minutes
1 Stops
06:55 PM CDG
Tue, 22 Aug Paris
Flight No. - AI 143
4 Seats Left BUSINESS
1,041 USD

Book Flights To Paris, Paris


Paris has a way of finding its way into your heart, consuming every fibre of your being like a completely irrational, whirlwind romance. Arriving in Paris with a modest French vocabulary, you easily get a feeling of being thrown headlong into the deep end – the Parisians aren’t exactly known for their accommodating attitude. However, you will settle in. London may boast a cosy atmosphere whilst Berlin has its hipster cool, but Paris is the prettiest of them all – with wide boulevards, gorgeous bridges and almost psychedelic orange sunsets.

The Eiffel Tower was only meant to stand for 20 years. It was completed in two years for the 1889 World’s Fair.

Paris is a generous city feeding its citizens with a constant flow of culture and happenings. Paris will never be a routine. The French consciously cultivate the hint of human madness and megalomania that is inside all of us, and as a result, they are always up to something crazy.

How’s the weather in Paris in August?

Temperature
Clouds days

Average rainfall
48 mm

Demographics

Population
2.3M
Local time
Currency
EUR

What does Paris cost?

Meal

Restaurant meals in Paris cost 79% more than in New York

Train

A typical train ticket is 130 USD

Top 10 Hotels in Paris, France


Places To Visit in Paris


  • Eiffel Tower

    Eiffel Tower

    The Eiffel Tower is an iron lattice tower located on the Champ de Mars in Paris, France. It was na

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    Eiffel Tower

    The Eiffel Tower is an iron lattice tower located on the Champ de Mars in Paris, France. It was named after the engineer Alexandre Gustave Eiffel, whose company designed and built the tower. Erected in 1889 as the entrance arch to the 1889 World's Fair, it was initially criticised by some of France's leading artists and intellectuals for its design, but has become both a global cultural icon of France and one of the most recognizable structures in the world. The tower is the tallest structure in Paris and the most-visited paid monument in the world; 6.98 million people ascended it in 2011. The tower received its 250 millionth visitor in 2010. The tower is 324 metres tall, about the same height as an 81-storey building. Its base is square, 125 metres on a side. During its construction, the Eiffel Tower surpassed the Washington Monument to assume the title of the tallest man-made structure in the world, a title it held for 41 years, until the Chrysler Building in New York City was built in 1930. Because of the addition of the aerial atop the Eiffel Tower in 1957, it is now taller than the Chrysler Building by 5.2 metres . Not including broadcast aerials, it is the second-tallest structure in France, after the Millau Viaduct. The tower has three levels for visitors, with restaurants on the first and second. The third level observatory's upper platform is 276 m above the ground, the highest accessible to the public in the European Union. Tickets can be purchased to ascend by stairs or lift to the first and second levels. The climb from ground level to the first level is over 300 steps, as is the walk from the first to the second level. Although there are stairs to the third and highest level, these are usually closed to the public and it is generally only accessible by lift. ^ "The Eiffel Tower at a glance-Things to Remember". SETE . Retrieved 1 January 2014. ^ a b c d "The Eiffel Tower at a glance-Key Figures". SETE . Retrieved 1 January 2014.

  • Arc de Triomphe

    Arc de Triomphe

    The Arc de Triomphe de l'Étoile is one of the most famous monuments in Paris. It stands in the cen

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    Arc de Triomphe

    The Arc de Triomphe de l'Étoile is one of the most famous monuments in Paris. It stands in the centre of the Place Charles de Gaulle , at the western end of the Champs-Élysées. It should not be confused with a smaller arch, the Arc de Triomphe du Carrousel, which stands west of the Louvre. The Arc de Triomphe honours those who fought and died for France in the French Revolutionary and the Napoleonic Wars, with the names of all French victories and generals inscribed on its inner and outer surfaces. Beneath its vault lies the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier from World War I. The Arc de Triomphe is the linchpin of the Axe historique – a sequence of monuments and grand thoroughfares on a route which runs from the courtyard of the Louvre to the Grande Arche de la Défense. The monument was designed by Jean Chalgrin in 1806 and its iconographic program pitted heroically nude French youths against bearded Germanic warriors in chain mail. It set the tone for public monuments, with triumphant patriotic messages. The monument stands 50 metres in height, 45 m wide and 22 m deep. The large vault is 29.19 m high and 14.62 m wide. The small vault is 18.68 m high and 8.44 m wide. Its design was inspired by the Roman Arch of Titus. The Arc de Triomphe is built on such a large scale that, three weeks after the Paris victory parade in 1919 , Charles Godefroy flew his Nieuport biplane through it, with the event captured on newsreel. It was the tallest triumphal arch in existence until the completion of the Monumento a la Revolución in Mexico City in 1938, which is 67 metres high. The Arch of Triumph in Pyongyang, completed in 1982, is modelled on the Arc de Triomphe and is slightly taller at 60 m .

  • Place de la Concorde

    Place de la Concorde

    The Place de la Concorde is one of the major public squares in Paris, France. Measuring 8.64 hectar

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    Place de la Concorde

    The Place de la Concorde is one of the major public squares in Paris, France. Measuring 8.64 hectares in area, it is the largest square in the French capital. It is located in the city's eighth arrondissement, at the eastern end of the Champs-Élysées.

  • Les Invalides

    Les Invalides

    Les Invalides , officially known as L'Hôtel national des Invalides , or also as L'Hôtel des Invali

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    Les Invalides

    Les Invalides , officially known as L'Hôtel national des Invalides , or also as L'Hôtel des Invalides, is a complex of buildings in the 7th arrondissement of Paris, France, containing museums and monuments, all relating to the military history of France, as well as a hospital and a retirement home for war veterans, the building's original purpose. The buildings house the Musée de l'Armée, the military museum of the Army of France, the Musée des Plans-Reliefs, and the Musée d'Histoire Contemporaine, as well as the burial site for some of France's war heroes, notably Napoleon Bonaparte .

  • Notre Dame de Paris

    Notre Dame de Paris

    Notre-Dame de Paris , also known as Notre-Dame Cathedral or simply Notre-Dame, is a historic Catholi

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    Notre Dame de Paris

    Notre-Dame de Paris , also known as Notre-Dame Cathedral or simply Notre-Dame, is a historic Catholic cathedral on the eastern half of the Île de la Cité in the fourth arrondissement of Paris, France. The cathedral is widely considered to be one of the finest examples of French Gothic architecture, and it is among the largest and most well-known church buildings in the world. The naturalism of its sculptures and stained glass are in contrast with earlier Romanesque architecture. As the cathedral of the Archdiocese of Paris, Notre-Dame is the parish that contains the cathedra, or official chair, of the archbishop of Paris, currently Cardinal André Vingt-Trois. The cathedral treasury is notable for its reliquary which houses some of Catholicism's most important first-class relics including the purported Crown of Thorns, a fragment of the True Cross, and one of the Holy Nails. In the 1790s, Notre-Dame suffered desecration during the radical phase of the French Revolution when much of its religious imagery was damaged or destroyed. An extensive restoration supervised by Eugène Viollet-le-Duc began in 1845. A project of further restoration and maintenance began in 1991.

  • Bataclan (theatre)

    Bataclan (theatre)

    The Bataclan is a "salle de spectacle" at 50 boulevard Voltaire in the 11th arrondissement of Paris.

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    Bataclan (theatre)

    The Bataclan is a "salle de spectacle" at 50 boulevard Voltaire in the 11th arrondissement of Paris. It was built in 1864 by the architect Charles Duval. Its name refers to Ba-Ta-Clan, an operetta by Offenbach, but is also wordplay on the expression le tout bataclan . The nearest métro stations are Oberkampf on Line 5 and Line 9 and Filles du Calvaire on Line 8.

  • Death of Diana, Princess of Wales

    Death of Diana, Princess of Wales

    On 31 August 1997, Diana, Princess of Wales died as a result of injuries sustained in a car crash in

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    Death of Diana, Princess of Wales

    On 31 August 1997, Diana, Princess of Wales died as a result of injuries sustained in a car crash in the Pont de l'Alma road tunnel in Paris, France. Her boyfriend, Dodi Fayed, and the driver of the Mercedes-Benz W140, Henri Paul, were pronounced dead at the scene; the bodyguard of Diana and Dodi, Trevor Rees-Jones, was the only survivor. Although the media blamed the paparazzi following the car, an 18-month French judicial investigation found that the crash was caused by Paul, who lost control of the car at high speed while drunk. Paul was the deputy head of security at the Hôtel Ritz and had earlier goaded the paparazzi waiting outside the hotel. His inebriation may have been exacerbated by anti-depressants and traces of a tranquilizing anti-psychotic in his body. The investigation concluded that the photographers were not near the Mercedes when it crashed. Since February 1998, Dodi's father, Mohamed Al-Fayed has claimed that the crash was a result of a conspiracy, and later contended that the crash was orchestrated by MI6 on the instructions of the Royal Family. His claims were dismissed by a French judicial investigation and by Operation Paget, a Metropolitan Police Service inquiry that concluded in 2006. An inquest headed by Lord Justice Scott Baker into the deaths of Diana and Dodi began at the Royal Courts of Justice, London, on 2 October 2007, a continuation of the inquest that began in 2004. On 7 April 2008, the jury concluded that Diana and Dodi were the victims of an "unlawful killing" by the "grossly negligent" chauffeur Henri Paul and the drivers of the following vehicles. Additional factors were "the impairment of the judgment of the driver of the Mercedes through alcohol" and "the death of the deceased was caused or contributed to by the fact that the deceased was not wearing a seat-belt, the fact that the Mercedes struck the pillar in the Alma Tunnel rather than colliding with something else". ^ http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/city/bengaluru/Mercedes-owners-to-get-together-on-October-21/articleshow/16747485.cms ^ Director: David Bartlett, Executive Producer: David Upshal. "The Coronation of Elizabeth II/The Death of Diana". Days That Shook the World. ^ a b Haldenby, Andrew; Julian Nundy, David Graves. "Diana crash caused by chauffeur, says report". The Daily Telegraph . Archived from the original on 13 November 2002. ^ Barbour, Dr. Alan D. "Synopsis of Autopsy Findings". Retrieved 15 August 2010. ^ Martyn Gregory "Stranded on Planet Fayed", The Spectator, 27 June 2007 ^ "Diana crash was a conspiracy – Al Fayed". BBC News. 12 February 1998. Retrieved 5 August 2008. ^ "Point-by-point: Al Fayed's claims". BBC News. 19 February 2008. Retrieved 5 August 2008. ^ "Diana death a 'tragic accident'". BBC News. 14 December 2006. Retrieved 5 August 2008. ^ "Inquests into the deaths of Diana, Princess of Wales and Mr Dodi Al Fayed: FAQs". Coroner's Inquests into the Deaths of Diana, Princess of Wales and Mr Dodi Al Fayed. Judicial Communications Office. 2008. Retrieved 4 June 2010. ^ Rayner, Gordon . "Diana jury blames paparazzi and Henri Paul for her 'unlawful killing'". Daily Telegraph . Retrieved 12 October 2013. ^ "Hearing transcripts: 7 April 2008 – Verdict of the jury". Judicial Communications Office. Retrieved 15 August 2010.

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