Cheap Flights To New York


1 Traveller(s),Economy
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Popular Flights

10:00 AM IAD
Tue, 02 May Washington, D.C.
1 Hours 16 Minutes
1 Stops
11:16 AM JFK
Tue, 02 May New York
Flight No. - B6 1308
7 Seats Left ECONOMY
134 USD
10:00 AM IAD
Tue, 02 May Washington, D.C.
1 Hours 19 Minutes
1 Stops
11:19 AM JFK
Tue, 02 May New York
Flight No. - DL 3761
1 Seats Left ECONOMY
134 USD
11:57 AM IAD
Tue, 02 May Washington, D.C.
6 Hours 33 Minutes
2 Stops
06:30 PM JFK
Tue, 02 May New York
Flight No. - AA 2213
7 Seats Left ECONOMY
402 USD

Book Flights To New York, New York


New York City is comparable to an enormous merry-go-round twirling about at tremendous speed – yet there is no reason to get dizzy. Just come along for the ride and you will soon get used to the pace. New York is a city of possibility: tall skyscrapers and green parks, exclusive restaurants and scruffy street kitchens, noisy taxis and bendy limousines, opera and hip-hop, as well as beautiful townhouses and ramshackle old apartment blocks. New York City is simply a 24-hour department store filled with infinite choices on all its shelves. The only problem is in the choosing.

Normally you’d hail a yellow cab, but in 2013 more than 1,000 green taxis were taken to the road to provide better taxi access to the boroughs outside Manhattan.

Buckle up and enjoy the ride – but be warned: it will make you want to come back for more.

How’s the weather in New York in April?

Temperature
Clouds days

Average rainfall
90 mm

Demographics

Population
8.3M
Local time
Currency
USD

What does New York cost?

Meal

Restaurant meals in New York cost 83% more than in New Delhi

Train

A typical train ticket is 180 INR

Top 10 Hotels in New York, United States


Places To Visit in New York


  • Washington Square Park

    Washington Square Park

    Washington Square Park is one of the best-known of New York City's 1,900 public parks. At 9.75 acres

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    Washington Square Park

    Washington Square Park is one of the best-known of New York City's 1,900 public parks. At 9.75 acres , it is a landmark in Manhattan in the neighborhood of Greenwich Village, as well as a meeting place and center for cultural activity. It is operated by the New York City Department of Parks and Recreation. The Park is an open space, dominated by the Washington Square Arch, with a tradition of celebrating nonconformity. The Park's fountain area has long been one of the city's popular spots for residents and tourists. Most of the buildings surrounding the park now belong to New York University, but many have at one time served as homes and studios for artists. Some of the buildings have been built by NYU, others have been converted from their former uses into academic and residential buildings.

  • Museum of American Finance

    Museum of American Finance

    The Museum of American Finance is the United States's only independent public museum dedicated to pr

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    Museum of American Finance

    The Museum of American Finance is the United States's only independent public museum dedicated to preserving, exhibiting and teaching about American finance and financial history. Located in the Financial District in Manhattan, New York City it is an affiliate of the Smithsonian Institution. It is a tax-exempt 501 3 organization chartered by the Board of Regents of the New York State Department of Education. With education at the core of its mission, it is an active national-level advocate on behalf of financial literacy. The museum was founded in 1988 as the Museum of American Financial History but was renamed the Museum of American Finance in 2005. Until December 2006, it was located at 26 Broadway. On January 11, 2008, the Museum opened in a new location at 48 Wall Street, the former headquarters of The Bank of New York.

  • Empire State Building

    Empire State Building

    WXNY-FM is a radio station that broadcasts a Spanish language format. It is licensed to Univision Ra

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    Empire State Building

    WXNY-FM is a radio station that broadcasts a Spanish language format. It is licensed to Univision Radio at 96.3 FM, and airs in the New York City metropolitan area. The station has a transmitter atop the Empire State Building.

  • Madison Square Garden

    Madison Square Garden

    Madison Square Garden, sometimes called MSG or The Garden, is a multi-purpose indoor arena in the Ne

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    Madison Square Garden

    Madison Square Garden, sometimes called MSG or The Garden, is a multi-purpose indoor arena in the New York City borough of Manhattan in the U.S. state of New York. Located in Midtown Manhattan between Seventh and Eighth Avenues from 31st to 33rd Streets, it is situated atop Pennsylvania Station. It is the fourth venue to bear the "MSG" name, the first two of which were located on Madison Square, on East 26th Street and Madison Avenue, with the third Madison Square Garden further uptown at Eighth Avenue and 50th Street. The Garden is used for professional basketball and ice hockey, as well as boxing, concerts, ice shows, circuses, and other forms of sports and entertainment. It is close to other midtown Manhattan landmarks, including the Empire State Building, Koreatown, and Macy's at Herald Square. It is home to the New York Rangers of the National Hockey League, the New York Knicks of the National Basketball Association, and residency to singer-songwriter, Billy Joel. Opening on February 11, 1968, it is the oldest and most active major sporting facility in the New York metropolitan area. It is the oldest arena in the National Hockey League and the second-oldest arena in the National Basketball Association. MSG is the fourth-busiest music arena in the world in terms of ticket sales, behind England's The O2 Arena, Manchester Arena and Scotland's The SSE Hydro. At a total construction cost of approximately $1.1 billion, MSG has been ranked as one of the ten most expensive stadium venues ever built. It is part of the Pennsylvania Plaza office and retail complex. Several other operating entities related to the Garden share its name.

  • New York Public Library

    New York Public Library

    The New York Public Library is a public library system in New York City. With nearly 53 million ite

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    New York Public Library

    The New York Public Library is a public library system in New York City. With nearly 53 million items, the New York Public Library is the second largest public library in the United States , and fourth largest in the world. It is an independently managed, nonprofit corporation operating with both private and public financing. The library has branches in the boroughs of Manhattan, The Bronx, and Staten Island, and affiliations with academic and professional libraries in the metropolitan area of New York State. The City of New York's other two boroughs, Brooklyn and Queens, are served by the Brooklyn Public Library and the Queens Borough Public Library, respectively. The branch libraries are open to the general public and consist of research libraries and circulating libraries. The library was developed in the 19th century, founded from an amalgamation of grass-roots libraries, and social libraries of bibliophiles and the wealthy, aided by the philanthropy of the wealthiest Americans of their age.

  • Metropolitan Tower (Manhattan)

    Metropolitan Tower (Manhattan)

    The Metropolitan Tower is a 77-story, 770 ft residential skyscraper in Manhattan, New York City, st

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    Metropolitan Tower (Manhattan)

    The Metropolitan Tower is a 77-story, 770 ft residential skyscraper in Manhattan, New York City, standing at 146 West 57th Street. The building has 235 apartment units. The tower could be described as an international style tower, but it was described as postmodern, because it features setbacks and triangular shapes, dark glass and a sculpted base. Construction started in 1984, and was finished in 1987. The tower caused minor discontent, because it blocked sight lines of Central Park. Critics' attention would turn, after the appearance of its taller neighbors, such as the CitySpire Center in 1987 and the Carnegie Hall Tower in 1991. The Metropolitan Tower is less than 10 meters from Carnegie Hall Tower, separated by the Russian Tea Room. The tower has a triangular floor plan, whose longer edge points to Central Park.

  • New York Crystal Palace

    New York Crystal Palace

    New York Crystal Palace was an exhibition building constructed for the Exhibition of the Industry of

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    New York Crystal Palace

    New York Crystal Palace was an exhibition building constructed for the Exhibition of the Industry of All Nations in New York City in 1853, which was under the presidency of the mayor Jacob Aaron Westervelt. The building stood in Reservoir Square. New York City's 1853 Exhibition was held on a site behind the Croton Distributing Reservoir, between Fifth and Sixth Avenues on 42nd Street, in what is today Bryant Park in the borough of Manhattan. The New York Crystal Palace was designed by Georg Carstensen and German architect Charles Gildemeister, and was directly inspired by The Crystal Palace built in London's Hyde Park to house The Great Exhibition of 1851. The New York Crystal Palace had the shape of a Greek cross, and was crowned by a dome 100 feet in diameter. Like the Crystal Palace of London, it was constructed from iron and glass. Construction was handled by engineer Christian Edward Detmold. Horatio Allen was the consulting engineer, and Edward Hurry the consulting architect. President Franklin Pierce spoke at the dedication on July 14, 1853. Theodore Sedgwick was the first president of the Crystal Palace Association. After a year, he was succeeded by Phineas T. Barnum who put together a reinauguration in May 1854 when Henry Ward Beecher and Elihu Burritt were the featured orators. This revived interest in the Palace, but by the end of 1856 it was a dead property. The adjoining Latting Observatory, a wooden tower 315 feet high, allowed visitors to see into Queens, Staten Island and New Jersey. The tower, taller than the spire of Trinity Church at 290 feet , was the tallest structure in New York City from the time it was constructed in 1853 until it burned down in 1856. The New York Crystal Palace itself was destroyed by fire on October 5, 1858. When it burned, the fair of the American Institute was being held there. The fire began in a lumber room on the side adjacent to 42nd Street. Within fifteen minutes its dome fell and in twenty-five minutes the entire structure had burned to the ground. No lives were lost but the loss of property amounted to more than $350,000. This included the building, valued at $125,000, and exhibits and valuable statuary remaining from the World's Fair. Elisha Otis demonstrated the safety elevator, which prevented the fall of the cab if the cable broke, at the Crystal Palace in 1854 in a death-defying, dramatic presentation. That year another building directly inspired by London's Crystal Palace, the Glaspalast in Munich, was inaugurated.

  • Union Square, Manhattan

    Union Square, Manhattan

    Union Square is an important and historic intersection and surrounding neighborhood in Manhattan, Ne

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    Union Square, Manhattan

    Union Square is an important and historic intersection and surrounding neighborhood in Manhattan, New York City, located where Broadway and the former Bowery Road – now Fourth Avenue – came together in the early 19th century; its name celebrates neither the Federal union of the United States nor labor unions but rather denotes that "here was the union of the two principal thoroughfares of the island". The current Union Square Park is bounded by 14th Street on the south, Union Square West on the west side, 17th Street on the north, and on the east Union Square East, which links together Broadway and Park Avenue South to Fourth Avenue and the continuation of Broadway. The park is under the aegis of the New York City Department of Parks and Recreation. Adjacent neighborhoods are the Flatiron District to the north, Chelsea to the west, Greenwich Village to the southwest, East Village to the southeast, and Gramercy Park to the east. Many buildings of The New School are near the square, as are several dormitories of New York University. The eastern side of the square is dominated by the four Zeckendorf Towers, on the former site of the bargain-priced department store, S. Klein, and the south side by the full-square block mixed-use One Union Square South . It features a kinetic wall sculpture and digital clock expelling bursts of steam, titled Metronome. Among the heterogeneous assortment of buildings along the west side is the Decker Building. Union Square is noted for its impressive equestrian statue of U.S. President George Washington, modeled by Henry Kirke Brown and unveiled in 1856, the first public sculpture erected in New York City since the equestrian statue of George III in 1770, and the first American equestrian sculpture cast in bronze; the historic moment depicted is Evacuation Day, November 25, 1783, when the British left the city and General Washington triumphantly led his troops back into the city. Other statues in the park include the Marquis de Lafayette, modeled by Frédéric Auguste Bartholdi and dedicated at the Centennial, July 4, 1876, Abraham Lincoln, modeled by Henry Kirke Brown , and the James Fountain , a Temperance fountain with the figure of Charity who empties her jug of water, aided by a child; it was donated by Daniel Willis James and sculpted by Adolf Donndorf. A statue of Mahatma Gandhi in the southwest corner of the park was added in 1986. Union Square lies over the 14th Street – Union Square New York City Subway station, served by the 4 5 6 <6> L N Q R trains.

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