Cheap Flights To Moscow


1 Traveller(s),Economy

Popular Flights

04:45 AM DEL
Tue, 22 Aug Washington, D.C.
21 Hours 20 Minutes
3 Stops
02:05 AM SVO
Thu, 24 Aug Moscow
Flight No. - EY 5702
4 Seats Left ECONOMY
583 USD
11:25 PM DEL
Tue, 22 Aug Washington, D.C.
16 Hours 55 Minutes
2 Stops
04:20 PM SVO
Wed, 23 Aug Moscow
Flight No. - CZ 360
4 Seats Left ECONOMY
718 USD
12:25 AM DEL
Tue, 22 Aug Washington, D.C.
16 Hours 0 Minutes
2 Stops
04:25 PM SVO
Tue, 22 Aug Moscow
Flight No. - AF 225
2 Seats Left ECONOMY
1,135 USD

Book Flights To Moscow, Moscow


Land of billionaires, borsch and bathhouses, Moscow is a constant over-the-top performance of classic heritage meets trendy kitsch. This city is as crass as it is elegant, at once unapologetically flashy and yet bursting at the seams with underground culture. You can count the gilded domes of the stunning Muscovite cathedrals or head to the former meatpacking district for old warehouses turned hip art galleries.

Moscow's strikingly ornate underground was the world’s second most heavily used in 2012 - after the subway in Seoul.

Enjoy a stroll through Gorky Park or find the highest skyscraper for a panoramic view of the Kremlin. If you’re looking for the perfect souvenir, head towards the Ismaylovo flea market, a treasure trove of trinkets from Romanov samovars to Soviet medals. After a sophisticated evening at the Bolshoi or a bohemian evening at the Circus, leggy models and signature vodka await in Moscow's infamously exclusive night clubs.

How’s the weather in Moscow in August?

Temperature
Clear days

Average rainfall
58 mm

Demographics

Population
11.5M
Local time
Currency
RUB

What does Moscow cost?

Meal

Restaurant meals in Moscow cost 70% more than in New Delhi

Train

A typical train ticket is 46 INR

Top 10 Hotels in Moscow, Russian Federation


Places To Visit in Moscow


  • Lenin's Mausoleum

    Lenin's Mausoleum

    Lenin's Mausoleum , also known as Lenin's Tomb, situated in Red Square in the center of Moscow, is t

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    Lenin's Mausoleum

    Lenin's Mausoleum , also known as Lenin's Tomb, situated in Red Square in the center of Moscow, is the mausoleum that serves as the current resting place of Vladimir Lenin. His embalmed body has been on public display there since shortly after his death in 1924 . Aleksey Shchusev's diminutive but monumental granite structure incorporates some elements from ancient mausoleums, such as the Step Pyramid and the Tomb of Cyrus the Great.

  • Moscow Kremlin

    Moscow Kremlin

    The Moscow Kremlin , usually referred to as the Kremlin, is a fortified complex at the heart of Mosc

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    Moscow Kremlin

    The Moscow Kremlin , usually referred to as the Kremlin, is a fortified complex at the heart of Moscow, overlooking the Moskva River to the south, Saint Basil's Cathedral and Red Square to the east, and the Alexander Garden to the west. It is the best known of the kremlins and includes five palaces, four cathedrals, and the enclosing Kremlin Wall with Kremlin towers. The complex serves as the official residence of the President of the Russian Federation. The name Kremlin means "fortress inside a city", and is often used as a metonym to refer to the government of the Russian Federation in a similar sense to how the White House is used to refer to the Executive Office of the President of the United States. Indeed, even the Russian president's official website is www.kremlin.ru. It had previously been used to refer to the government of the Soviet Union and its highest members . "Kremlinology" refers to the study of Soviet and Russian politics. ^ "Кремль". Vasmer Etymological dictionary.

  • Red Square

    Red Square

    Red Square is a city square in Moscow, Russia. It separates the Kremlin, the former royal citadel

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    Red Square

    Red Square is a city square in Moscow, Russia. It separates the Kremlin, the former royal citadel and currently the official residence of the President of Russia, from a historic merchant quarter known as Kitai-gorod. Red Square is often considered the central square of Moscow, because Moscow's major streets—which connect to Russia's major highways—originate from the square.

  • Saint Basil's Cathedral

    Saint Basil's Cathedral

    The Cathedral of Vasily the Blessed , commonly known as Saint Basil's Cathedral, is a church in Red

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    Saint Basil's Cathedral

    The Cathedral of Vasily the Blessed , commonly known as Saint Basil's Cathedral, is a church in Red Square in Moscow, Russia. The building, now a museum, is officially known as the Cathedral of the Intercession of the Most Holy Theotokos on the Moat or Pokrovsky Cathedral . It was built from 1555–61 on orders from Ivan the Terrible and commemorates the capture of Kazan and Astrakhan. A world famous landmark it was the city's tallest building until the completion of the Ivan the Great Bell Tower in 1600. The original building, known as Trinity Church and later Trinity Cathedral, contained eight side churches arranged around the ninth, central church of Intercession; the tenth church was erected in 1588 over the grave of venerated local saint Vasily . In the 16th and 17th centuries the church, perceived as the earthly symbol of the Heavenly City, as happens to all churches in Byzantine Christianity, was popularly known as the "Jerusalem" and served as an allegory of the Jerusalem Temple in the annual Palm Sunday parade attended by the Patriarch of Moscow and the tsar. The building is shaped as a flame of a bonfire rising into the sky, a design that has no analogues in Russian architecture. Dmitry Shvidkovsky, in his book Russian Architecture and the West, states that "it is like no other Russian building. Nothing similar can be found in the entire millennium of Byzantine tradition from the fifth to fifteenth century ... a strangeness that astonishes by its unexpectedness, complexity and dazzling interleaving of the manifold details of its design." The cathedral foreshadowed the climax of Russian national architecture in the 17th century. As part of the program of state atheism, the church was confiscated from the Russian Orthodox community as part of the Soviet Union's anti-theist campaigns and has operated as a division of the State Historical Museum since 1928. It was completely and forcefully secularized in 1929 and remains a federal property of the Russian Federation. The church has been part of the Moscow Kremlin and Red Square UNESCO World Heritage Site since 1990. It is often mislabelled as the Kremlin owing to its location on Red Square in immediate proximity of the Kremlin.

  • Moscow theater hostage crisis

    Moscow theater hostage crisis

    The Moscow theater hostage crisis, also known as the 2002 Nord-Ost siege, was the seizure of the cro

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    Moscow theater hostage crisis

    The Moscow theater hostage crisis, also known as the 2002 Nord-Ost siege, was the seizure of the crowded Dubrovka Theater on 23 October 2002 by 40 to 50 armed Chechens who claimed allegiance to the Islamist militant separatist movement in Chechnya. They took 850 hostages and demanded the withdrawal of Russian forces from Chechnya and an end to the Second Chechen War. The siege was officially led by Movsar Barayev. Due to the disposition of the theater, special forces would have had to fight through 100 feet of corridor and attack up a well defended staircase, before they could reach the hall in which the hostages were held. The terrorists also had numerous explosives, with the most powerful in the center of the auditorium, that, if detonated, could have brought down the ceiling and caused in excess of 80 percent casualties. After a two-and-a-half day siege and the execution of two female hostages, Spetsnaz operators from Federal Security Service Alpha and Vega Groups, supported by Russian Ministry of Internal Affairs SOBR unit, pumped an undisclosed chemical agent into the building's ventilation system and raided it. All 40 of the attackers were killed, with no casualties among Spetsnaz but about 130 hostages died, including nine foreigners, due to adverse reactions to the gas. All but two of the hostages who died during the siege were killed by the toxic substance pumped into the theater to subdue the militants. The use of the gas was widely condemned as heavy-handed, but the American and British governments deemed Russia's actions justifiable. Physicians in Moscow condemned the refusal to disclose the identity of the gas that prevented them from saving more lives. Some reports said the drug naloxone was successfully used to save some hostages.

  • Russian Orthodox Church

    Russian Orthodox Church

    The Russian Orthodox Church , alternatively legally known as the Moscow Patriarchate , also known in

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    Russian Orthodox Church

    The Russian Orthodox Church , alternatively legally known as the Moscow Patriarchate , also known in English as the Orthodox Christian Church of Russia, is one of the autocephalous Eastern Orthodox churches, in full communion with other Eastern Orthodox churches. The ROC officially ranks fifth in the Orthodox order of precedence, right under the four ancient Greek Patriarchates of the Greek Orthodox Church, those of Constantinople, Alexandria, Antioch, and Jerusalem. The Primate of the ROC is the Patriarch of Moscow and all Rus'. The ROC currently claims its exclusive jurisdiction over the Orthodox Christians, irrespective of their ethnic background, who reside in the former member republics of the USSR, excluding Georgia and Armenia, although this claim is disputed in such countries as Estonia and Moldova and consequently parallel canonical Orthodox jurisdictions exist in those: Estonian Apostolic Orthodox Church and Metropolis of Bessarabia, respectively. It also exercises ecclesiastical jurisdiction over the autonomous Church of Japan and the Orthodox Christians resident in the People's Republic of China. The ROC branches in Belarus, Estonia, Latvia, Moldova and Ukraine since the 1990s enjoy various degrees of self-government, albeit short of the status of formal ecclesiastical autonomy. In Ukraine, ROC has tensions with schismatic groups supported by the current government, while it enjoys the position of numerically dominant religious organisation. The ROC should not be confused with the Orthodox Church in America , another autocephalous Orthodox Church , that traces its existence in North America to the time of the Russian missionaries in Alaska in the late 18th century, and still largely adheres to the ROC liturgical tradition. The ROC should also not be confused with the Russian Orthodox Church Outside Russia , headquartered in New York, the U.S.A. The ROCOR was instituted in the 1920s by Russian communities outside then Communist Russia, which refused to recognize the authority of the Moscow Patriarchate then de facto headed by Metropolitan Sergius Stragorodsky. The two Churches reconciled on May 17, 2007; the ROCOR is now a self-governing part of the Russian Orthodox Church. ^ "Vladimir I – Russiapedia History and mythology Prominent Russians". Retrieved 5 March 2015. ^ "Primacy and Synodality from an Orthodox Perspective". Retrieved 5 March 2015. ^ Русская церковь объединяет свыше 150 млн. верующих в более чем 60 странах - митрополит Иларион Interfax.ru 2 March 2011 ^ "I. Общие положения - Русская Православная Церковь". Retrieved 5 March 2015. ^ "Диптих". Retrieved 5 March 2015. ^ "Religious tensions deepen Ukraine splits - Russian Orthodox official". Reuters. Retrieved 5 March 2015.

  • Fallen Monument Park

    Fallen Monument Park

    Fallen Monument Park is a park outside the Krymsky Val building in Moscow shared by the modern art

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    Fallen Monument Park

    Fallen Monument Park is a park outside the Krymsky Val building in Moscow shared by the modern art division of Tretyakov Gallery and Central House of Artists. It is located between the Park Kultury and the Oktyabrskaya underground stations. The origins of this expatriate English name are unknown; in Russian, the park is either simply named Sculpture Park of the Central House of Artists or referred to by its legal title, Muzeon Park of Arts . Muzeon Park was established by the City of Moscow in 1992 and currently displays over 700 sculptures. It is split into themed sections, i.e. the Oriental Garden, Pushkin Square, Portrait Row, although the best known part — the fallen monuments themselves — appeared here before 1992. In October 1991, when the Soviet Union collapsed, smaller socialist realism statues of Soviet leaders and unidentifiable workers and peasants were removed from their pedestals, hauled to the park and left in their fallen form. They were rectified later, although missing original pedestals. In 1990s these statues shaped the park outline, but as more and more modern sculpture was added and as the young trees grew up, they became a less obvious minority. In 1995, Muzeon added a World War II section - these sculptures, of the same socialist realism vintage, were never displayed in open air before. In 1998 the park acquired 300 sculptures of victims of communist rule made by Evgeny Chubarov, installed as a single group. The park also holds temporary summer shows of modern artists.

  • Buran (spacecraft)

    Buran (spacecraft)

    The Buran spacecraft , GRAU index 11F35 K1 was a Soviet orbital vehicle analogous in function and de

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    Buran (spacecraft)

    The Buran spacecraft , GRAU index 11F35 K1 was a Soviet orbital vehicle analogous in function and design to the US Space Shuttle, developed by Chief Designer Gleb Lozino-Lozinskiy of RKK Energia. Buran completed one unmanned spaceflight in 1988 and remains the only Soviet reusable spacecraft to be launched into space; the Buran programme was cancelled in 1993 following the dissolution of the USSR. It was treated as a Soviet space shuttle but only the plane itself was theoretically reusable, and while it was recovered successfully after its first orbital flight it was never reused. The expendable Energia rocket served as its launch vehicle. The only Buran to actually fly in space was destroyed in 2002 at the Baikonur Cosmodrome, when the hangar it was stored in collapsed. ^ a b c d e f "Buran". NASA. 12 November 1997. Archived from the original on 4 August 2006. Retrieved 2006-08-15. ; Buran at the Wayback Machine ^ Eight feared dead in Baikonur hangar collapse, RSpaceflkight Now . ^ "Buran". Russian Space Web. 2012-10-15. Retrieved 2013-09-28.

People who likes Moscow