Cheap Flights To London

Get cheap tickets, latest travel deals, and lowest airfares to your destination.


1 Traveller(s),Economy

Popular Flights

11:25 PM DEL
Tue, 22 Aug Washington, D.C.
15 Hours 40 Minutes
2 Stops
03:05 PM LHR
Wed, 23 Aug London
Flight No. - CZ 360
4 Seats Left ECONOMY
477 USD
01:30 AM DEL
Tue, 22 Aug Washington, D.C.
8 Hours 0 Minutes
2 Stops
09:30 AM LHR
Tue, 22 Aug London
Flight No. - SU 235
3 Seats Left ECONOMY
553 USD
02:00 PM DEL
Tue, 22 Aug Washington, D.C.
5 Hours 0 Minutes
1 Stops
07:00 PM LHR
Tue, 22 Aug London
Flight No. - AI 111
9 Seats Left ECONOMY
840 USD

Book Flights To London, London


Cockney shouts ring through the streets, street food chefs work magic on their stoves, and aromas of a thousand cuisines mingle in the air. Reggae music is overlaid with rock’n’roll. Take a deep breath and dive into one of London’s markets. Hunt for old records in Brick Lane, haggle over antiques in Portobello Road and feast on jellied eels in Spitalfields. Once you’ve bagged a bargain, head down to the South Bank. Here, you can tick off the landmarks – Big Ben, the London Eye, Tower Bridge, the Shard – and enjoy the unique entertainment, whether it’s dancing sheep or a bicycle-powered art installation.

The Thames may be London’s most famous river, but secret rivers run beneath the streets: one flows right underneath Buckingham Palace.

After dark, head to The City, presided over by St. Paul’s Cathedral. Here, they work and play hard, so ascend to a high rise bar – Sushisamba in the Heron Tower is a suitably glamorous option – where your cocktails will be accompanied by spectacular views. The streets may not be gold in this part of town, but they certainly shine.

How’s the weather in London in August?

Temperature
Rain days

Average rainfall
63 mm

Demographics

Population
8.3M
Local time
Currency
GBP

What does London cost?

Meal

Restaurant meals in London cost 84% more than in New Delhi

Train

A typical train ticket is 210 INR

Top 10 Hotels in London, United Kingdom


Places To Visit in London


  • Westminster Abbey

    Westminster Abbey

    Westminster Abbey, formally titled the Collegiate Church of St Peter at Westminster, is a large, mai

    Click here

    Westminster Abbey

    Westminster Abbey, formally titled the Collegiate Church of St Peter at Westminster, is a large, mainly Gothic church in the City of Westminster, London, located just to the west of the Palace of Westminster. It is one of the most notable religious buildings in the United Kingdom and has been the traditional place of coronation and burial site for English and, later, British monarchs. Between 1540 and 1556 the abbey had the status of a cathedral. Since 1560, however, the building is no longer an abbey nor a cathedral, having instead the status of a "Royal Peculiar" – a church responsible directly to the Sovereign. According to a tradition first reported by Sulcard in about 1080, a church was founded at the site in the 7th century, at the time of Mellitus , a Bishop of London. Construction of the present church began in 1245, on the orders of Henry III. Since 1066, when Harold Godwinson and William the Conqueror were crowned, the coronations of English and British monarchs have been held here. Since 1100, there have been at least 16 royal weddings at the abbey. Two were of reigning monarchs , although before 1919 there had been none for some 500 years. ^ Newcomb, Rexford . "Abbey". In Johnston, Bernard. Collier's Encyclopedia. I A to Ameland . New York, NY: P.F. Collier. pp. 8–11. ^ "The National Heritage List For England". English Heritage. Retrieved 31 July 2011. ^ History – Westminster Abbey. Retrieved 29 April 2011 ^ "History". Dean and Chapter of Westminster Abbey. Retrieved 19 April 2008. ^ "Coronations". Dean and Chapter of Westminster Abbey. Retrieved 19 April 2008. Westminster-abbey.org ^ "Royal Weddings at Westminster Abbey". Westminster Abbey. Retrieved 29 April 2011.

  • Palace of Westminster

    Palace of Westminster

    The Palace of Westminster is the meeting place of the House of Commons and the House of Lords, the t

    Click here

    Palace of Westminster

    The Palace of Westminster is the meeting place of the House of Commons and the House of Lords, the two houses of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. Commonly known as the Houses of Parliament after its occupants, the Palace lies on the Middlesex bank of the River Thames in the City of Westminster, in central London. Its name, which derives from the neighbouring Westminster Abbey, may refer to either of two structures: the Old Palace, a medieval building complex that was destroyed by fire in 1834, and its replacement, the New Palace that stands today. For ceremonial purposes, the palace retains its original style and status as a royal residence and is the property of the Crown. The first royal palace was built on the site in the eleventh century, and Westminster was the primary residence of the Kings of England until a fire destroyed much of the complex in 1512. After that, it served as the home of the Parliament of England, which had been meeting there since the thirteenth century, and also as the seat of the Royal Courts of Justice, based in and around Westminster Hall. In 1834, an even greater fire ravaged the heavily rebuilt Houses of Parliament, and the only medieval structures of significance to survive were Westminster Hall, the Cloisters of St Stephen's, the Chapel of St Mary Undercroft, and the Jewel Tower. The subsequent competition for the reconstruction of the Palace was won by the architect Charles Barry, whose design was for new buildings in the Gothic Revival style, specifically inspired by the English Perpendicular Gothic style of the 14th-16th centuries. The remains of the Old Palace were incorporated into its much larger replacement, which contains over 1,100 rooms organised symmetrically around two series of courtyards. Part of the New Palace's area of 3.24 hectares was reclaimed from the Thames, which is the setting of its principal 266-metre façade, called the River Front. Barry was assisted by Augustus W. N. Pugin, a leading authority on Gothic architecture and style, who provided designs for the decorations and furnishings of the Palace. Construction started in 1840 and lasted for thirty years, suffering great delays and cost overruns, as well as the death of both leading architects; works for the interior decoration continued intermittently well into the twentieth century. Major conservation work has been carried out since, to reverse the effects of London's air pollution, and extensive repairs took place after the Second World War, including the reconstruction of the Commons Chamber following its bombing in 1941. The Palace is one of the centres of political life in the United Kingdom; "Westminster" has become a metonym for the UK Parliament, and the Westminster system of government has taken its name after it. The Elizabeth Tower, in particular, which is often referred to by the name of its main bell, "Big Ben", is an iconic landmark of London and the United Kingdom in general, one of the most popular tourist attractions in the city and an emblem of parliamentary democracy. The Palace of Westminster has been a Grade I listed building since 1970 and part of a UNESCO World Heritage Site since 1987.

  • London Eye

    London Eye

    The London Eye is a giant Ferris wheel on the South Bank of the River Thames in London. Also known a

    Click here

    London Eye

    The London Eye is a giant Ferris wheel on the South Bank of the River Thames in London. Also known as the Millennium Wheel, its official name was originally published as the British Airways London Eye, then the Merlin Entertainments London Eye, then the EDF Energy London Eye. Since mid-January 2015, it has been known in branding as the Coca-Cola London Eye, following an agreement signed in September 2014. The entire structure is 135 metres tall and the wheel has a diameter of 120 metres . When erected in 1999 it was the world's tallest Ferris wheel. Its height was surpassed by the 160 m Star of Nanchang in 2006, the 165 m Singapore Flyer in 2008, and the 167.6 m High Roller in 2014. Supported by an A-frame on one side only, unlike the taller Nanchang and Singapore wheels, the Eye is described by its operators as "the world's tallest cantilevered observation wheel". It is currently Europe's tallest Ferris wheel, and offered the highest public viewing point in London until it was superseded by the 245-metre observation deck on the 72nd floor of The Shard, which opened to the public on 1 February 2013. It is the most popular paid tourist attraction in the United Kingdom with over 3.5 million visitors annually, and has made many appearances in popular culture. The London Eye adjoins the western end of Jubilee Gardens , on the South Bank of the River Thames between Westminster Bridge and Hungerford Bridge, in the London Borough of Lambeth.

  • Buckingham Palace

    Buckingham Palace

    Buckingham Palace is the London residence and principal workplace of the monarchy of the United Kin

    Click here

    Buckingham Palace

    Buckingham Palace is the London residence and principal workplace of the monarchy of the United Kingdom. Located in the City of Westminster, the palace is often at the centre of state occasions and royal hospitality. It has been a focus for the British people at times of national rejoicing. Originally known as Buckingham House, the building which forms the core of today's palace was a large townhouse built for the Duke of Buckingham in 1703 on a site which had been in private ownership for at least 150 years. It was subsequently acquired by King George III in 1761 as a private residence for Queen Charlotte and was known as "The Queen's House". During the 19th century it was enlarged, principally by architects John Nash and Edward Blore, who formed three wings around a central courtyard. Buckingham Palace finally became the official royal palace of the British monarch on the accession of Queen Victoria in 1837. The last major structural additions were made in the late 19th and early 20th centuries, including the East front, which contains the well-known balcony on which the royal family traditionally congregates to greet crowds outside. However, the palace chapel was destroyed by a German bomb during World War II; the Queen's Gallery was built on the site and opened to the public in 1962 to exhibit works of art from the Royal Collection. The original early 19th-century interior designs, many of which still survive, included widespread use of brightly coloured scagliola and blue and pink lapis, on the advice of Sir Charles Long. King Edward VII oversaw a partial redecoration in a Belle Époque cream and gold colour scheme. Many smaller reception rooms are furnished in the Chinese regency style with furniture and fittings brought from the Royal Pavilion at Brighton and from Carlton House. The Buckingham Palace Garden is the largest private garden in London. The state rooms, used for official and state entertaining, are open to the public each year for most of August and September, as part of the Palace's Summer Opening.

  • Madame Tussauds

    Madame Tussauds

    Madame Tussauds is a wax museum in London with branches in a number of major cities. It was founded

    Click here

    Madame Tussauds

    Madame Tussauds is a wax museum in London with branches in a number of major cities. It was founded by wax sculptor Marie Tussaud and was formerly known as "Madame Tussaud's"; the apostrophe is no longer used. Madame Tussauds is a major tourist attraction in London, displaying waxworks.

  • Winston Churchill

    Winston Churchill

    Parliament Square is a square at the northwest end of the Palace of Westminster in London. It featur

    Click here

    Winston Churchill

    Parliament Square is a square at the northwest end of the Palace of Westminster in London. It features a large open green area in the centre with trees to its west and it contains ten statues of statesmen and other notable individuals. As well as being one of London's main tourist attractions, it is also the place where many demonstrations and protests have been held. The square is overlooked by various official buildings: legislature to the east , executive offices to the north , the judiciary to the west , and the church to the south .

  • MI5

    MI5

    The Security Service, commonly known as MI5 , is the United Kingdom's domestic counter-intelligence

    Click here

    MI5

    The Security Service, commonly known as MI5 , is the United Kingdom's domestic counter-intelligence and security agency and is part of its intelligence machinery alongside the Secret Intelligence Service focused on foreign threats, Government Communications Headquarters and Defence Intelligence . All come under the direction of the Joint Intelligence Committee . The service has a statutory basis in the Security Service Act 1989 and the Intelligence Services Act 1994. Its remit includes the protection of British parliamentary democracy and economic interests, counter-terrorism and counter-espionage within the UK. Although mainly concerned with internal security, it does have an overseas role in support of its mission. Within the civil service community the service is colloquially known as Box 500 . The service has had a national headquarters at Thames House on Millbank in London since 1995, drawing together personnel from a number of locations into a single HQ facility. Thames House was, until March 2013, shared with the Northern Ireland Office and is also home to the Joint Terrorism Analysis Centre, a subordinate organisation to the Security Service. The service has offices across the United Kingdom including an HQ in Northern Ireland. Details of the northern operations centre in Greater Manchester were revealed by the firm who built it. Plans to open the northern operations centre were reported by The Manchester Evening News in February 2005, and plans to open a permanent Scottish office in Glasgow were reported by The Scotsman in January of that year.

People who likes London