Cheap Flights To Berlin


1 Traveller(s),Economy

Popular Flights

04:35 AM DEL
Tue, 22 Aug Washington, D.C.
9 Hours 25 Minutes
2 Stops
02:00 PM TXL
Tue, 22 Aug Berlin
Flight No. - 9W 582
1 Seats Left ECONOMY
440 USD
04:45 AM DEL
Tue, 22 Aug Washington, D.C.
11 Hours 50 Minutes
3 Stops
04:35 PM TXL
Wed, 23 Aug Berlin
Flight No. - EY 5702
4 Seats Left ECONOMY
459 USD
04:35 AM DEL
Tue, 22 Aug Washington, D.C.
9 Hours 25 Minutes
2 Stops
02:00 PM TXL
Tue, 22 Aug Berlin
Flight No. - 9W 582
7 Seats Left ECONOMY
485 USD

Book Flights To Berlin, Berlin


Berlin is everything and everyone. Berlin gives you the past, the present and the future. It is a city where everything moves, shifts, and splits apart, yet there are plenty of havens where you can take a breather. Every neighbourhood tells a story. In some wild flowers grow up through the pavement, while others are luxurious and grandiose. And every one of them gives you a reason to love Berlin.

Berlin is Germany’s greenest city. About 44% of the area consists of parks, woods, rivers and lakes.

Soak up the vibe of Kreuzberg, where an untamed spirit burns. Love Prenzlauer Berg’s laid-back atmosphere. Take in Mitte’s raw but beautiful preservation of the city’s historical baggage. Enjoy Charlottenburg-Wilmersdorf for its class and Schöneberg for its colourful, unprejudiced liveliness. Enjoy this amazing city, there is nothing like it.

How’s the weather in Berlin in August?

Temperature
Clear days

Average rainfall
45 mm

Demographics

Population
3.4M
Local time
Currency
EUR

What does Berlin cost?

Meal

Restaurant meals in Berlin cost 66% more than in New Delhi

Train

A typical train ticket is 200 INR

Top 10 Hotels in Berlin, Germany


Places To Visit in Berlin


  • Checkpoint Charlie

    Checkpoint Charlie

    Checkpoint Charlie was the name given by the Western Allies to the best-known Berlin Wall crossing

    Click here

    Checkpoint Charlie

    Checkpoint Charlie was the name given by the Western Allies to the best-known Berlin Wall crossing point between East Berlin and West Berlin during the Cold War. GDR leader Walter Ulbricht agitated and maneuvered to get the Soviet Union's permission for the construction of the Berlin Wall in 1961 to stop Eastern Bloc emigration westward through the Soviet border system, preventing escape across the city sector border from East Berlin to West Berlin. Checkpoint Charlie became a symbol of the Cold War, representing the separation of East and West. Soviet and American tanks briefly faced each other at the location during the Berlin Crisis of 1961. After the dissolution of the Eastern Bloc and the reunification of Germany, the building at Checkpoint Charlie became a tourist attraction. It is now located in the Allied Museum in the Dahlem neighborhood of Berlin.

  • Brandenburg Gate

    Brandenburg Gate

    The Brandenburg Gate is an 18th-century neoclassical triumphal arch in Berlin, and one of the best-

    Click here

    Brandenburg Gate

    The Brandenburg Gate is an 18th-century neoclassical triumphal arch in Berlin, and one of the best-known landmarks of Germany. It is built on the site of a former city gate that marked the start of the road from Berlin to the town of Brandenburg an der Havel. It is located in the western part of the city centre of Berlin, at the junction of Unter den Linden and Ebertstraße, immediately west of the Pariser Platz. One block to the north stands the Reichstag building. The gate is the monumental entry to Unter den Linden, the renowned boulevard of linden trees, which formerly led directly to the city palace of the Prussian monarchs. It was commissioned by King Frederick William II of Prussia as a sign of peace and built by Carl Gotthard Langhans from 1788 to 1791. Having suffered considerable damage in World War II, the Brandenburg Gate was fully restored from 2000 to 2002 by the Stiftung Denkmalschutz Berlin . During the post-war Partition of Germany, the gate was isolated and inaccessible immediately next to the Berlin Wall, and the area around the gate was featured most prominently in the media coverage of the opening of the wall in 1989. Throughout its existence, the Brandenburg Gate was often a site for major historical events and is today considered a symbol of the tumultuous history of Europe and Germany, but also of European unity and peace. ^ "Das Brandenburger Tor" . Die Stiftung Denkmalschutz Berlin. Retrieved 14 May 2011.

  • Berlin Wall

    Berlin Wall

    The Berlin Wall was a barrier that divided Berlin from 1961 to 1989, constructed by the German Demo

    Click here

    Berlin Wall

    The Berlin Wall was a barrier that divided Berlin from 1961 to 1989, constructed by the German Democratic Republic starting on 13 August 1961, that completely cut off West Berlin from surrounding East Germany and from East Berlin until it was opened in November 1989. Its demolition officially began on 13 June 1990 and was completed in 1992. The barrier included guard towers placed along large concrete walls, which circumscribed a wide area that contained anti-vehicle trenches, "fakir beds" and other defenses. The Eastern Bloc claimed that the wall was erected to protect its population from fascist elements conspiring to prevent the "will of the people" in building a socialist state in East Germany. In practice, the Wall served to prevent the massive emigration and defection that marked East Germany and the communist Eastern Bloc during the post-World War II period. The Berlin Wall was officially referred to as the "Anti-Fascist Protection Rampart" by GDR authorities, implying that the NATO countries and West Germany in particular were "fascists." The West Berlin city government sometimes referred to it as the "Wall of Shame"—a term coined by mayor Willy Brandt—while condemning the Wall's restriction on freedom of movement. Along with the separate and much longer Inner German border , which demarcated the border between East and West Germany, it came to symbolize the "Iron Curtain" that separated Western Europe and the Eastern Bloc during the Cold War. Before the Wall's erection, 3.5 million East Germans circumvented Eastern Bloc emigration restrictions and defected from the GDR, many by crossing over the border from East Berlin into West Berlin, from where they could then travel to West Germany and other Western European countries. Between 1961 and 1989, the wall prevented almost all such emigration. During this period, around 5,000 people attempted to escape over the wall, with an estimated death toll of from 136 to more than 200 in and around Berlin. In 1989, a series of radical political changes occurred in the Eastern Bloc, associated with the liberalization of the Eastern Bloc's authoritarian systems and the erosion of political power in the pro-Soviet governments in nearby Poland and Hungary. After several weeks of civil unrest, the East German government announced on 9 November 1989 that all GDR citizens could visit West Germany and West Berlin. Crowds of East Germans crossed and climbed onto the wall, joined by West Germans on the other side in a celebratory atmosphere. Over the next few weeks, euphoric people and souvenir hunters chipped away parts of the wall; the governments later used industrial equipment to remove most of what was left. Contrary to popular belief the wall's actual demolition did not begin until the summer of 1990 and was not completed until 1992. The fall of the Berlin Wall paved the way for German reunification, which was formally concluded on 3 October 1990. ^ a b Chicago Tribune . "Untangling 5 myths about the Berlin Wall". chicagotribune.com. Retrieved 1 November 2014. ^ Video: Berlin, 1961/08/31 . Universal Newsreel. 1961. Retrieved 20 February 2012. ^ http://www.thejournal.ie/berlin-wall-anniversary-1762450-Nov2014/ ^ Jack Marck "Over the Wall: A Once-in-a-Lifetime Experience" American Heritage, October 2006. ^ ^ "Freedom! – TIME". TIME

  • Memorial to the Murdered Jews of Europe

    Memorial to the Murdered Jews of Europe

    The Memorial to the Murdered Jews of Europe , also known as the Holocaust Memorial , is a memorial i

    Click here

    Memorial to the Murdered Jews of Europe

    The Memorial to the Murdered Jews of Europe , also known as the Holocaust Memorial , is a memorial in Berlin to the Jewish victims of the Holocaust, designed by architect Peter Eisenman and engineer Buro Happold. It consists of a 19,000 m2 site covered with 2,711 concrete slabs or "stelae", arranged in a grid pattern on a sloping field. The stelae are 2.38 m long, 0.95 m wide and vary in height from 0.2 to 4.8 m . They are organized in rows, 54 of them going north-south, and 87 heading east-west at right angles but set slightly askew. An attached underground "Place of Information" holds the names of all known Jewish Holocaust victims, obtained from the Israeli museum Yad Vashem. Building began on April 1, 2003 and was finished on December 15, 2004. It was inaugurated on May 10, 2005, sixty years after the end of World War II, and opened to the public two days later. It is located one block south of the Brandenburg Gate, in the Friedrichstadt neighborhood. The cost of construction was approximately €25 million. The memorial has attracted some controversy, and was described by Ignatz Bubis, the then leader of the German Jewish community, as unnecessary.

  • Berghain

    Berghain

    Berghain is a nightclub in Berlin, Germany, named after its location near the border between Kreuzbe

    Click here

    Berghain

    Berghain is a nightclub in Berlin, Germany, named after its location near the border between Kreuzberg and Friedrichshain. Philip Sherburne described it in 2007 as "quite possibly the current world capital of techno, much as E-Werk or Tresor were in their respective heydays."

  • Reichstag building

    Reichstag building

    The Reichstag building is a historical edifice in Berlin, Germany, constructed to house the Imperia

    Click here

    Reichstag building

    The Reichstag building is a historical edifice in Berlin, Germany, constructed to house the Imperial Diet , of the German Empire. It was opened in 1894 and housed the Diet until 1933, when it was severely damaged in a fire. After World War II, the building fell into disuse; the parliament of the German Democratic Republic met in the Palast der Republik in East Berlin, while the parliament of the Federal Republic of Germany met in the Bundeshaus in Bonn. The ruined building was made safe against the elements and partially refurbished in the 1960s, but no attempt at full restoration was made until after German reunification on 3 October 1990, when it underwent a reconstruction led by architect Norman Foster. After its completion in 1999, it once again became the meeting place of the German parliament: the modern Bundestag. The term Reichstag, when used to connote a diet, dates back to the Holy Roman Empire. The building was built for the Diet of the German Empire, which was succeeded by the Reichstag of the Weimar Republic. The latter would become the Reichstag of Nazi Germany, which left the building after the 1933 fire and never returned; the term Reichstag has not been used by German parliaments since World War II. In today's usage, the German word Reichstag refers mainly to the building, while Bundestag refers to the institution.

  • Glienicke Bridge

    Glienicke Bridge

    The Glienicke Bridge is a bridge across the Havel River in Germany, connecting the Wannsee district

    Click here

    Glienicke Bridge

    The Glienicke Bridge is a bridge across the Havel River in Germany, connecting the Wannsee district of Berlin with the Brandenburg capital Potsdam. It is named after nearby Glienicke Palace. The current bridge, the fourth on the site, was completed in 1907, although major reconstruction was necessary after it was damaged during World War II.

  • Wannsee Conference

    Wannsee Conference

    The Wannsee Conference was a meeting of senior officials of Nazi Germany, held in the Berlin suburb

    Click here

    Wannsee Conference

    The Wannsee Conference was a meeting of senior officials of Nazi Germany, held in the Berlin suburb of Wannsee on 20 January 1942. The purpose of the conference, called by director of the SS-Reichssicherheitshauptamt SS-Obergruppenführer Reinhard Heydrich, was to ensure the cooperation of administrative leaders of various government departments in the implementation of the final solution to the Jewish question, whereby most of the Jews of German-occupied Europe would be deported to Poland and murdered. Conference attendees included representatives from several government ministries, including state secretaries from the Foreign Office, the justice, interior, and state ministries, and representatives from the Schutzstaffel . In the course of the meeting, Heydrich outlined how European Jews would be rounded up from west to east and sent to extermination camps in the General Government , where they would be killed. Legalized discrimination against Jews began immediately after the Nazi seizure of power on 30 January 1933. Violence and economic pressure were used by the Nazi regime to encourage Jews to voluntarily leave the country. After the invasion of Poland in September 1939, the extermination of European Jewry began, and the killings continued and accelerated after the invasion of the Soviet Union in June 1941. On 31 July 1941 Hermann Göring gave written authorization to Heydrich to prepare and submit a plan for a "total solution of the Jewish question" in territories under German control and to coordinate the participation of all involved government organisations. At the Wannsee Conference, Heydrich emphasised that once the deportation process was complete, the exterminations would become an internal matter under the purview of the SS. A secondary goal was to arrive at a definition of who was Jewish and thus determine the scope of the exterminations. One copy of the Wannsee Protocol, the circulated minutes of the meeting, survived the war to be found by Robert Kempner, lead U.S. prosecutor before the International Military Tribunal at Nuremberg, in files that had been seized from the German Foreign Office. The Wannsee House, site of the conference, is now a Holocaust Memorial.

People who likes Berlin